C-SUITE

Abercrombie & Fitch names CFO

BY Marianne Wilson

It's a homecoming for Abercrombie & Fitch Co.'s next finance head.

The teen apparel retailer appointed Scott D. Lipesky as senior VP and CFO, effective October 2, 2017. Lipesky most recently served as CFO of American Signature Inc., a privately-held home furnishings company. Prior to that, he spent nine years with Abercrombie in a variety of finance roles, most recently as CFO of Hollister Co.

At Abercrombie, Lipesky succeeds — and will report to — Joanne Crevoiserat, executive VP and COO. She has continued to serve as CFO after her promotion to COO in February 2017.

"Having previously spent nine successful years with us, Scott has strong relationships here and an intimate knowledge of our business and culture that will serve him and the company well, as we continue to execute aggressively against our strategic plan," said Crevoiserat.

Lipesky began his career at PricewaterhouseCoopers. His experience includes roles as corporate finance director with FTI Consulting, a global financial services advisory firm, and director of corporate business development with The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
DESIGN/CONSTRUCTION

Jeweler makes stylish debut on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile

BY Marianne Wilson

David Yurman has opened his first boutique on Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

Conceived by the Yurmans, the 3,250-sq.-ft. space reflects the brand's aesthetic and the family's unique artistic expression, and has a two-story historical façade that was maintained and restored to its original condition. The entrance lobby features a heritage wall that visually narrates the Yurmans' journey from art to jewelry with examples of David's early sculptures and wearable art pieces alongside more current designs.

The interior was inspired by the colors of the brand's most iconic gemstones and the hues in Sybil Yurman's paintings that hang throughout the space. The store's focal point is the central display column, featuring six cylindrical vitrines placed around a pillar of metal rods, reminiscent of the metal strands used in the crafting our jewelry. This feature acts as a focal display for the brand's most iconic pieces, and invites patrons to meander through the space. In the main area, violet motifs that were hand-applied over white gold leaf on decorative panels offer a subdued elegance.

Other distinct features include a men's jewelry area and a private salon. The men's area has a distinctly masculine feel created through the use of darker materials and found objects.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS

California grocer’s educates customers at the shelf’s edge

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Raley’s is helping its customers make more informed food purchasing decisions in-store and online.

Called the Raley’s Shelf Guide, the program features icon-based shelf tags that educate shoppers about current food trends and industry research — and also sets stricter standards for packaged food claims. Overall, the service is creating label transparency when it comes to helping customers understand packaged goods’ ingredients, food processing and nutritional value.

The California-based supermarket chain developed the program through a partnership with Label Insight. The data science company’s proprietary data-as-a-service platform uses machine learning, semantic engine technology, and unique attribute IP to deliver complete and accurate product information for more than 400,000 products. Results were used to develop a set of custom attributes for the Raley's Shelf Guide.

By converting these details into simple and colorful icons found on shelf tags, Raley’s Shelf Guide helps customers quickly interpret whether a product meets their needs, without having to analyze multiple labels. The grocer also created two of their own shelf tag descriptions – making it easy for customers to find food that is minimally processed and nutrient dense.

Also available online, the program is part of Raley’s click-and-collect service. When using the grocer’s eCart program, online shoppers can sort for products using Shelf Guide icons to quickly find products that meet their health and wellness needs. More than 13,000 items in center store have at least one icon.

“We knew that Raley’s could develop a program that truly addresses the needs of our customers and serve as a trusted advisor. Raley’s Shelf Guide attributes will help our customers make easier decisions when shopping our stores,” said Michael Teel, owner and CEO, Raley's. “Only foods that meet the strict standards of Raley’s will qualify for the Shelf Guide tags. I challenge food manufacturers to aspire to meet our Shelf Guide standards for their products at Raley’s.”

Raley's operates 122 stores in Northern California and Nevada under four banners: Raley’s, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods and Food Source.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...