News

Borders: The Final Chapter

BY Marianne Wilson

Kudos to Borders for not forgetting its most loyal customers as it begins the slow and painful process of shutting down operations.

Unlike the no-regrets disappearing act of some other retailers, Borders actually sent out a thank-you to the nearly 1.8 million members of its Rewards loyalty program. With a subject line of “A Fond Farewell …. Thank you for Shopping at Borders,” the e-mail laid out the chain’s failure to find a bidder in simple layman’s terms while also acknowledging the headwinds it has been facing for some time. It ended on a graceful note, and was signed by CEO Mike Gordon.

As to the “whys” of Borders demise, there really is little mystery. From mismanagement and bad real estate decisions to e-commerce and the e-book revolution, Borders found itself challenged with gale-force headwinds that it could not escape. It was never able to right its ship.

I’ve covered this industry for 20 years. I’m astute enough to know that in retail, as in nature, only the strong survive. Retailers that don’t evolve quickly enough to keep pace with the changing times are doomed to mediocrity — or failure. I also know that, ultimately, Borders has no one to blame for its demise but itself. It made a lot of bad decisions in recent years, decisions that didn’t serve the company or its 10,000 associates well.

Although I shopped Borders (it was convenient, just down the block from my office), I have no sentimental attachment to it. But I take no pleasure in seeing a retailer close its doors — especially a once-mighty one like Borders — or in anyone losing their job. And as the most recent tenant vacancy reports indicate, there are still lots of empty spaces in malls and shopping centers. Borders’ liquidation will only add to the dark spaces. I can’t imagine any shopping center developers are cheering this final chapter in the bookseller’s saga.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
OPERATIONS

Play ball! J.C. Penney’s former CMO to open baseball camp

BY Marianne Wilson

New York City — Mike Boylson, formerly executive VP and CMO of J.C. Penney, has traded retailing for baseball. The 32-year J.C. Penney veteran, who officially stepped down from the company on July 1, and a friend are opening a franchise of D-Bat, a baseball and softball training academy, Advertising Age reported. The facility is due to open this fall.

Boylson’s new venture will be located in Allen, Texas, not far from J.C. Penney’s headquarters in Plano. According to the report, the 27,000-sq.-ft. location will feature batting cages, including a designated "showcase cage" with clay pitcher’s mounds, a pro-shop and a parents’ lounge. Other offerings include classes, camps and clinics.

Industry experts have speculated that Boylson’s sudden retirement was the first part of a general houskeeping that would occur under new incoming CEO Ron Johnson. But Boylson had no idea about Johnson’s impending appointment when he told J.C. Penney CEO Myron “Mike” Ullman that he planned to retire early, according to the report. Boyson is 56.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
REAL ESTATE

Bottom Dollar to enter Pittsburgh and Youngstown, Ohio, markets

BY Staff Writer

Salisbury, N.C. — Discount grocer Bottom Dollar Food plans to enter the greater Pittsburgh, and Youngstown, Ohio, markets, starting with 14 locations.

Most of the locations are expected to open in early 2012.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...