REAL ESTATE

Evanston Plaza welcomes three new tenants

BY Michael Fickes

Evanston, Ill. — Three new tenants are coming to the 212,373-sq.-ft. Evanston Plaza on Chicago’s North Shore, according to Mid-America Asset Management Inc., the exclusive representative of the center.

DaVita, a division of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc., signed a lease for 10,000 sq. ft. and plans to open a kidney dialysis center in the fall of 2013. The U.S. Army & Marines lease 2,424 sq. ft. for a recruitment center. Papa Romeo’s Pizza has taken 1,464 sq. ft.

JCI Real Estate Alliance represented DaVita. The other tenants were self-represented.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
News

NRF holds retail roundtable

BY CSA STAFF

The National Retail Federation and the Retail Association of Nevada hosted Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev., at a retail roundtable discussion. More than a dozen community retailers and small business owners gathered to address the industry’s challenges and public policy priorities.

“The retail industry is the largest private sector employer in the United States,” NRF president and CEO Matthew Shay said. “We need to make sure lawmakers understand how policy issues impact retailers, our employees and our consumers. Facilitating discussions on these important issues is essential to ensuring that retailers, large and small, have a voice in Washington.”

Amodei engaged local retailers in a discussion on the economy, tax reform, immigration, health and labor policy and online sales tax collection.

"When it comes to the key issues of the economy, health care, taxes, and even immigration, local retailers and their employees are really on the front lines,” Congressman Amodei said. “I appreciate an opportunity like this roundtable to hear what effect decisions being made in Washington are having on businesses, jobs, and consumers here in Nevada.”

“Our members are deeply concerned with the federal issues that will have a significant impact on their ability to hire new employees and keep their doors open,” Retail Association of Nevada senior director Lea Tauchen said. “Whether it’s the Affordable Care Act, Federal Unemployment Insurance or Sequestration, there is no doubt that Congress is engaged on issues that affect us. We appreciate Representative Amodei for taking the time to sit down and explore these issues.”

The retail roundtable is a part of the NRF’s This is Retail campaign, which highlights the retail industry’s positive contribution to careers, community and innovation.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
News

Health and Wellness Should be a Critical Element in a Retailer’s Go-To Market Strategy

BY CSA STAFF

By Jeff Weidauer, [email protected]

One of the major advantages retail brick-and-mortar stores have is the day-to-day interaction with customers, the ability to hear — first-hand and in real-time — their concerns, compliments and complaints. The best retailers learn how to respond to this feedback quickly, either at the store or corporate levels.

In recent years, shoppers have expressed a much greater interest in getting more information at the shelf while in the store. This has been driven in no small part by the availability of additional information when shopping online. It’s a natural extension to expect that information at the shelf edge in the local store.

The types of information shoppers are looking for vary to some degree by category (ratings and pairings in wine; symptoms in analgesics; recipes in the center store), but one type that has become a requirement across the entire store is the communication of health and wellness information.

According to research done by the Food Marketing Institute (FMI) for its 2012 report “Shopping for Health,” a growing number of shoppers are more concerned about buying more healthful foods for themselves and their families, and they are focusing on nutritional components to help make those choices. Whole grain is near the top of the list of preferred ingredients, and there is a trend toward “less processed” food.

For a great example of how the interest in healthier options is making an impact, take a look at the Greek yogurt phenomenon. New York-based Chobani launched its Greek-style yogurt in 2007; not exactly great timing for any new product launch given the recession that year. Six years later, however, Greek yogurt is a fast-growing $2 billion business, with no end in sight.

While this is all good news for the nation’s health, there remains a lot of murkiness surrounding concepts like “natural,” “organic,” and “local.” According to the FMI study, three-fourths of shoppers believe these are all synonymous. Clearly, there is a need for better information — from a trusted source — that is easy for shoppers to access.

While all food products are required to carry an ingredient list and the Nutrition Fact Panel (NFP), which shows relative values of things like salt, calories and cholesterol, shoppers don’t always look at these. In any case, they don’t always help in the selection of what food to buy. Terms like “less processed” are highly subjective and not especially helpful when looking for healthful alternatives.

Supermarkets are trying to do their part to address the needs of shoppers. Most have at least one dietitian on staff now. Some have entire departments devoted to health and wellness initiatives based on shopper demand. But even a full staff of dietitians can’t always be available to answer questions or provide information to shoppers.

In response to the growing need, shelf edge-based programs are becoming more prevalent, like Vestcom’s healthyAisles — the largest and most customizable program for supermarket and drug stores. This program uses the shelf price label as a way to communicate specific qualities relevant to the product to help shoppers find what they want. Rather than a score or ranking, attributes like “low salt” or “good source of calcium” are depicted right on the label for easy comparison.

The beauty of a shelf edge program is how it both uses and builds on the trust that shoppers have in their local store. Plus, for those with a strong dietitian program, it provides an in-store connection to tie the overall program together in a way that is easy for shoppers to use.

Nutrition and wellness are not short-term fads. More and more consumers across generations are making long-term lifestyle changes that will continue to influence their purchase decisions, including where they shop. Safeway CEO Steve Burd recently made the statement that he saw a near-term future where Safeway stores would be primarily wellness centers that sell food. Other retailers are following suit, adding more organic products and expanding local sourcing.

Local products, while not always organic, tend to be less processed, something many shoppers are interested in. A shorter trip from farm to shelf means a lower carbon footprint and a fresher product. These are relevant to shoppers looking to modify their diets in a positive manner, and they will seek out those stores that make local sourcing a priority.

In the battle for market share and shopper loyalty, a focus on health and wellness is a critical element in a retailer’s go-to-market strategy. Value pricing is an expectation, and soon a comprehensive wellness offering will be as well.

Jeff Weidauer is VP of marketing and strategy for Vestcom International Inc., a Little Rock, Ark.-based provider of integrated shopper marketing solutions. He can be reached at [email protected].


More Web Exclusives/Guest Commentaries

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

A.Khatri says:
Dec-22-2013 12:32 pm

see the blog
Now, this is a patient that I’ve seen from day one in my practice. I’ve been practicing for about 10 years, and I love it when Richard comes in. see the blog

A.Khatri says:
Dec-22-2013 12:32 pm

Now, this is a patient that I’ve seen from day one in my practice. I’ve been practicing for about 10 years, and I love it when Richard comes in. see the blog

A.Khatri says:
Dec-19-2013 12:51 pm

http://detoxpads.org/detox
As the BodyPure2x detox pads are placed on our skin, the natural herbs interact, and begin their work by emitting far infrared energy. http://detoxpads.org/detox

A.Khatri says:
Dec-19-2013 12:51 pm

As the BodyPure2x detox pads are placed on our skin, the natural herbs interact, and begin their work by emitting far infrared energy. http://detoxpads.org/detox

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...