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STORE SPACES

First Look: Iconic 70’s retailer returns to stage with new flagship

BY Marianne Wilson

Fiorucci is back — and it hasn’t lost its cheeky, irreverent attitude.

The brand, which acquired cult status and flourished throughout the 1970s and 1980s before going into a slow decline, was relaunched earlier this year with a new website, new fashions and pop-ups in Barneys New York and Selfridges (London). Capping off its comeback, Fiorucci has opened a 5,000-sq-ft. flagship in London’s SoHo neighborhood. A New York City location is planned for 2018.

Designed by U.K. firm Brinkworth, the store celebrates the brand’s return, and is accented with graphics and art that recall its celebrated past. The theatrical environment combines fashion, culture, music — and cocktails — amid a range of different colors and textures. The store is colorful and cheeky — the lingerie department is set off with a giant circular bed.

The three-story space (two floors of retail, with a wholesale showroom in the basement) features a spiral staircase, accented with a floral installation. It has a customization area where jeans can be tailored and personalized, and other items can be embellished with graphics from the Fiorucci archives.

The store also has a cocktail bar and lounge area, and a cafe (Fioruccino’s) that serves up the brand’s signature angel icon on cupcakes.

Founded in 1967, Fiorucci gained cult status in the 1970s, best known for branded jeans and sexy fashions. Its flagships, in New York, London and Milan, were celebrated for their colorful pop-styled interiors, party atmosphere, and hip clientele (the New York City location was often called “a daytime Studio 54”). But mismanagement, legal battles and changing times took a toll on the brand, which went into receivership in 1989. A couple of relaunches failed to take off.

In 2015, the company was acquired by Janie and Stephen Schaffer, co-founders of the U.K. lingerie chain Knickerbox, who are overseeing the relaunch.

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ECOMMERCE

Online giant now owns a 3D body scanning startup

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Amazon’s newest acquisition could give a boost to the company’s fashion category — including its growing private-label apparel business.

The online giant has acquired Body Labs, a 3D scanning platform that uses artificial intelligence, computer vision, and body modeling to accurately create an avatar-like image of a customer’s dimensions. The 3D platform provider announced the news on its website.

While Body Labs declined to share details about the transaction, the deal is anticipated to be between $50 million and $70 million, according to TechCrunch, which initially broke the story.

The digital platform captures 3D body motions and shapes, and models can be applied to numerous industries, including gaming and apparel, according to Body Labs’ website. This is a natural fit for Amazon, as it could streamline how online shoppers virtually try on clothes prior to making a purchase, as well as reduce merchandise returns.

For example, Amazon continues to roll out new private label lines across men’s, women’s and children’s apparel, men’s and women’s shoes, lingerie and underwear categories. The company also operates its “try before you buy” Prime Wardrobe service — a subscription-based program that enables Prime members to order (and try on) from three to 15 items of clothing before they actually buy any of the items.

By integrating 3D modeling across both categories, more accurate fittings supported by Body Labs could reduce the rate of returned merchandise — as well as operating costs associated with excess returns, according to TechCrunch.

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ECOMMERCE

Survey: Retailers are missing out on a big opportunity

BY Marianne Wilson

For all the buzz about buy-online-pickup-in-store, not that many retailers are actually deploying the service.

Only 29.1% of U.S. retailers and 23.5% of Canadian retailers offer click &amp collect, according to a report by OrderDynamics, which notes that both countries are still in the very early phase of click and collect deployments. Of the more than 1,000 global retailers surveyed, 37% overall offer shoppers the option to buy online and pickup in store. The biggest adoption rate is in the U.K., where 67% of retailers offer the service.

Surprisingly, a large number of retailers with click and collect capabilities do not advertise this offering to customers, the study found. The U.S. was worst at advertising in-store pickup offerings, with only 38.5% of retailers with BOPIS alerting customers about the offering on their first webpage.

The study notes the importance of offering in-store pickups given that, in 58% of cases, it results in additional sales and is a way to keep shoppers coming back. It also recommends that retailers consider more than one pickup option for click and collect. Of over one thousand retailers in this study, Walmart stands as one of very few to offer four pickup options (in-store, pickup lockers, curb-side pickup, and postal outlet collection).

The Global Dynamics Omni-1000 report reveals the global and regional maturity, or lack thereof of a wide variety of omnichannel retail features. In other findings from the report:

&bull More retailers offer free shipping in North America (with a minimum order_ than the other regions surveyed. Seventy-five percent of Canadian retailers offer the service followed by 67% of U.S. retailers.

&bull Among the countries in the study, the U.S. and Canada show the lowest average minimum order for free shipping. The minimum basket for free shipping in the U.S. is $55.65, and $56.66 in Canada.

&bull Retail chains with more than 250 stores are twice as likely as chains made up of 10-50 stores to offer click and collect services.

&bull An overwhelming majority (90%) of retailers have standard e-commerce capabilities, such as the ability for shoppers to create a virtual shopping basket and purchase goods online.

&bull Sixty-eight percent provide basic inventory visibility to online consumers.

&bull Fifty-nine percent of retailers allow shoppers to buy online and return in-store.

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M.Vecht says:
Oct-05-2017 10:21 am

Survey: Retailers are missing out on a big opportunity
Interesting article, but what is the source of this survey? When was it done, by whom, how many respondents, etc.?

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