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Five-day online spending total surpasses $5 billion

BY Katherine Boccaccio

Reston, Va. — Survey results released Monday by comScore revealed that the most recent work-week saw four individual days eclipse $1 billion in spending, led by Green Monday with $1.275 billion.

comScore, which has monitored holiday season retail e-commerce spending for the first 44 days of the November–December 2012 holiday season, reported that to date $33.8 billion has been spent online, marking a 13% increase versus the corresponding days last year.

"This past workweek saw four days surpass the billion dollar spending threshold during the heaviest five-day online shopping period on record," said comScore chairman Gian Fulgoni. "With this most recent week in the books, the peak spending period may now be in our rear-view-mirror – but the online holiday shopping season is not over yet. We should have one more headline day on Free Shipping Day this Monday the 17th as the procrastinators among us scramble to order gifts in time for Christmas next week … We still expect that the full season will realize a growth rate well north of 13%.”

For the 2012 holiday season-to-date, eleven individual days have surpassed $1 billion in online retail sales, already surpassing last year’s record of 10 shopping days. Cyber Monday (Nov. 26, 2012) currently ranks as the heaviest online spending day of the season – and in history – at $1.465 billion. Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012 ranks second with $1.362 billion, followed by Monday, Dec. 10, 2012 (Green Monday) with $1.275 billion, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012 with $1.263 billion and Monday, Nov. 28, 2011 (Cyber Monday 2011) with $1.251 billion.

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Study: Top retailers leave 73% of customer tweets unanswered

BY Katherine Boccaccio

Chicago — E-commerce and digital marketing company Acquity Group announced Monday social media findings that revealed the vast majority of retailers don’t respond to customer tweets.

The 2012 Brand eCommerce Audit evaluated Interbrand’s 2012 Best Retail Brands on customer engagement across major digital channels, including big browser, social and mobile.

While every brand on the list except one has a Facebook page, and 45 out of 50 are on Twitter, only 12 brands had a cohesive presence across all five of the major social networks analyzed (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and YouTube).

The audit revealed Twitter had the largest gap between usage and interaction. With a 90% adoption rate among the brands, less than 27% actively participate in Twitter conversations with consumers. In fact, companies were least likely to respond to or engage with customers via Twitter than any other social media channel evaluated.

"Although most brands are signed up for the major social networks, many struggle to understand how they fit into their overarching business strategy,” said Jay Dettling, executive VP, Acquity Group. “As a result, our audit revealed several critical areas of improvement when it comes to actually connecting with consumers across social channels."

Brands were most active on YouTube, according to the research, with 80% of the brands leveraging the channel at an 85% engagement rate. Even though the majority of companies (56%) have yet to utilize Instagram, the brands with a presence on this platform also had a high level of interaction (79%). Pinterest was identified as the most popular up and coming social network, with 60% adoption and 70% interaction.

The 10 brands scoring best overall in social interaction include, in order of ranking: Target, Home Depot, RadioShack, Bath and Body Works, Nordstrom, Gap, eBay, Coach, American Eagle Outfitters and Banana Republic.

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S.Elsesser says:
Dec-19-2012 03:47 am

I agree with you, Twitter uses an open source code that is readily accessible to computer-inclined people who develop applications for cell phones or PC’s. It is much easier to spread a message in seconds than using a system that takes longer. You can reach out to millions of people in a matter of key clicks. Businesses that are not following up on their Twitter pages are missing great opportunities to quickly connect with their customers in a truly painless manner.

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Recall in Aisle 5! The Importance of Retailers’ Compliance With Consumer Product Safety Regulations

BY CSA STAFF

By Kevin M. Young, Karl A. Bekeny, and Chelsea R. Mikula, Tucker Ellis LLP

The rapidly changing world of consumer product safety is increasingly fraught with pitfalls for both retailers and manufacturers. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) made several significant changes to the law by instituting more onerous reporting obligations, heavier fines for failing to report, and prohibiting the sale of a recalled product, just to name a few. But the news isn’t all bad. Saferproducts.gov, the new publicly available consumer product safety information database, can help retailers stay up to date on safety concerns related to their products.

Saferproducts.gov has been a source of concern for manufacturers and retailers, but if used properly, it can also be a valuable tool. Perhaps best known for allowing consumers to report health and safety problems associated with consumer products, it can also help retailers stay in compliance with the CPSIA, as it provides a record of all recalls and other corrective actions that have been instituted by the manufacturer and/or the CPSC. Retailers can monitor its publicly searchable database to ensure that an unsafe or recalled product is not sitting on their shelves. Retailers can also sign up for one of the CPSC’s email, text message, or app services on recalls and receive daily notifications of recalls.

Under the CPSIA, retailers are required to report within 24 hours a consumer product that:

1. Fails to comply with an applicable consumer product safety rule;
2. Contains a defect that could create a “substantial product hazard”; or
3. Contains a defect that creates an unreasonable risk of serious injury or death.

Retailers must report to the CPSC any information they receive regarding a product that poses a health or safety risk unless they have actual knowledge that the CPSC is already aware of the risk. A retailer may contact the manufacturer, importer, distributor, private labeler, or anyone else in the supply chain to determine whether this incident has already been reported to the CPSC, or, since time is of the essence, the retailer may choose to report directly to the CPSC. Timely reporting is critical to avoiding significant fines.

The CPSC’s response to a violation of the law varies depending on the specific facts, including the nature of the product defect, number of products sold, and severity of the risk of injury associated with the product. Penalties under the CPSIA carry maximum civil fines of $100,000 per violation and $15 million for a series of violations. Six- and seven-figure fines were not unusual in 2011, including one fine as high as $1.3 million.

And these fines are not limited to manufacturers. In October 2009, a large retailer paid $600,000 for knowingly importing and selling various toys with paint or other surface coatings that contained lead levels above the legal limits. The CPSC alleged that the retailer failed to take adequate action to ensure that its products were in compliance with the law. Similarly, in July 2011, another large retailer paid $750,000 for knowingly selling children’s outerwear with drawstrings in the neck that posed an obvious choking hazard, as alleged by the CPSC.

In addition to instituting more onerous reporting obligations and fines, the CPSIA also made it a violation of the act for retailers to sell recalled products, making it imperative for them to stay up to date on product recalls. If a manufacturer fails to inform its retailers of a recall and the retailers do not remove the product from their shelves, then the retailers could face civil and/or criminal penalties.

Retailers should also know that recalls are not limited to manufacturers. Retailers may face situations where they have to recall their own private-brand products. Moreover, when a manufacturer went out of business in May 2012, five retailers, working in conjunction with the CPSC, initiated a recall of the manufacturer’s crib and play yard tents. The retailers stepped in to make sure the recall proceeded as required and that they complied with the CPSC regulations. In dealing with that type of situation, it is important that retailers understand the processes and procedures required by the CPSC.

  • Retailers would be wise to put processes in place now to stay ahead of future reporting obligations, instead of beating back civil penalties and reacting to claims and litigation.
  • Keep open communication with the manufacturers of your products so you are aware of any recalls.
  • In the event that you recall a product or assist a manufacturer in a recall, make sure notifications are targeted and communicated quickly and accurately.
  • Monitor Saferproducts.gov for recalls and reports of harm and/or sign up for one of the recall notification systems regarding products you sell.
  • Make sure that all employees from sales to management are trained on the obligations under the CPSIA so they know who to contact in the event they are notified about an incident involving one of your products.
  • Create an incident response team that includes members from all company departments that have an interest in how you, as a retailer, will respond if you receive notification of an incident or in the event you need to initiate a recall. Establishing this team will help expedite your investigation and make it easier for you to make informed decisions in the short period of time provided. This team should be tailored for the specific needs of each retailer. Implementing these proactive measures will help retailers avoid pitfalls and will go a long way toward preventing future liability.

Kevin M. Young is a partner at Tucker Ellis LLP, a full-service, 160+ attorney law firm with offices in Cleveland, Columbus, Denver, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. He heads the Tucker Ellis CPSC task force that closely monitors consumer product safety issues around the world. He can be reached at [email protected].

Karl A. Bekeny is counsel with Tucker Ellis LLP. As a member of the Tucker Ellis CPSC task force, Karl advises clients on developing consumer product safety issues around the world. He can be reached at [email protected].

Chelsea R. Mikula is an associate with Tucker Ellis LLP where she practices commercial litigation and counsels businesses on the Consumer Product Safety Commission Database and the implications of new laws around the world. She can be reached at [email protected].


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