STORE SPACES

Francesca’s, Maurices and Five Below expanding

BY Marianne Wilson

New York — Francesca’s, Maurices and tween/teen fave Five Below are in an expansion mode.

Francesca’s, based in Houston, will open about 85 stores this year, down slightly from 91 openings last year.

Maurices, which recently opened its 900th store, is on track to open 60 stores by the end of its fiscal year in July 2014. In addition, the retailer, which is owned by Ascena Retail Group, is remodeling or expanding 80 stores. Over the past five years, Maurices has opened more than 250 locations. It has a long-term goal to surpass 1,200 U.S. stores and 100 locations in Canada, where it currently operates 25 stores.

Five Below, based in Philadelphia, plans to open 62 stores this year across such new markets as Houston and the state of Tennessee, as well as existing markets that allow for densification opportunities.

In other new store openings:

• Zumiez plans to open up to 55 new stores during fiscal 2014, including up to seven in Canada and five in Europe.

• Burlington Coat Factory plans to open 25 net new stores during fiscal 2014, including 22 in the fall, two in May and one in April.
• Conn’s Inc. is looking to open 15 to 20 new stores during fiscal 2015.

• Destination XL Group Inc. plans to open approximately 40 DXL stores this year. Some of the new DXL stores will be smaller-sized locations in smaller markets.

• Mall of America has launched a $325 million expansion project that will include a JW Marriott hotel, office tower, high-end retailers, and new dining options. An extension of the mall on all three levels on the north side, it is the most significant construction project at the property since opening in 1992.

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STORE SPACES

Expert: Retail lighting primarily LED by 2025

BY Staff Writer

New York — By 2025, most retail lighting will be LED, or light-emitting diode, according to lighting expert Dr. Laura Priestwood Thompson, director of the TCU Center for Lighting Education, Texas Christian University.

“The majority of interior retail lighting in 2025 will be LED. This includes retrofitting and new construction,” Dr. Thompson told attendees as Chain Store Age’s 50th annual SPECS conference, which was held March 9 –12, in Grapevine, Texas.

Thompson said there are several advantages to using LED lighting. Although LED lighting is still somewhat expensive short term, in the long term it may still represent a more cost-effective investment than cheaper traditional lighting. In addition to various rebate programs, Thompson also cited the resiliency and power of LED lighting.

“You get a lot of lumens from a few watts,” she explained. “You get thirteen to fifteen lumens from 60 watts to 70 watts. This translates to high ROI from high efficacy. LED lights last 50,000-plus hours, so maintenance in changing them is lower. There is no mercury, lead or glass. They are durable and dimmable.”

Furthermore, Thompson said LED is becoming a mainstream lighting technology, meaning its cost will decline as time goes on.

“LED will be affordable for the masses in 10 to 15 years,” predicted Thompson. “Today, it is mostly deployed for artistic and creative uses Fluorescent lighting still exists. It has applicability in some places.”

Part of the expansion in retail LED lighting Thompson sees in the next 10 years or so is a vast increase in its use for exterior, as well as interior, lighting.

“By 2025, virtually all exterior lighting will be LED,” stated Thompson. “Right now, we have serious light pollution. Light is wasted shining up or on ‘light trespass,’ which is the uncontrolled glare or light from another property intruding on a property. If the property is another retailer they probably won’t care, but if it is residential or mixed use, they will probably mind.”

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E.Gastelum says:
Apr-04-2014 05:20 am

LED Mythology
What's not discussed and never brought up from someone who comes from a "Lighting Education Center" is enlightening the users. What should be know is that all light sources have their pro's and con's. LEDs have their weakness's too. Heat being one of them, the other is getting enough usable light, in reality "Lumens" do nothing. This is hyped up term that is very hard for the average consumer to ever measure, and it's a number that is bloated by the LED manufacturer. We want to know usable light, how much it lights a surface or a room. I myself come from the electric sign industry and like everything else when it comes to retrofitting here is another "con" for LEDs. Most of the time the user will hear ROI in just a few years. Nothing is further from the truth, most of the time the reality is 20+ years, 40+ in a lot of cases. There is a big reason why big theme parks like Disney have gone from LED back to Neon. One of the biggest marketing terms is "LEDs" are 80% more efficient than T12 lamps, or Neon, or HID lamps. Again, false. When you measure usable light from LEDs vs say...Neon, or HO Fluor Lamps. The comparisons are like putting a penlight to a Maglite and saying the penlight is more efficient. True, it is but it's only putting out a fraction of light as the maglite and then claiming it's more efficient. It's also not fair to take money from tax payers in the form of a rebate and give it so someone who decides to use a lamp over their neighbor. That's stealing from Paul to give to Peter. This gives the false notion that LEDs are cost effective. What they just did was have government pick a winner, not the free market or consumer. LEDs should not be handicapped instead they should stand on their own merit. Mercury, Lead, Glass, just nothing more than environmental scare, or marketing material for the consumer to buy LED. Fact is most inexpensive LEDs are made in China. China has coal plants and it takes more energy to make LEDs than a Neon or Fluorescent lamp...MUCH more and that is putting more mercury into the air than what is contained in a mercury lamp which is all contained in a glass. So it's better to spend 150 watts to save 5 watts from another light source? Since the earlier marketing claims have not worked out so well especially in the electric sign industry where rebates have disappeared, Energy Efficiency in ROI has been debunked as a non factor and mercury is no longer a valid fear factor the new marketing point is "Light Trespass". This one really makes my chuckle. anything to sell I suppose. The reality is and another con for LEDs is, LEDs are angled pinpoint light that does not disperse very well and you need alot of it to light up a room or surface. Neon, Fluorescent, and incandescent lamps have a bigger advantage that they are 360 degree lamps. Most LEDs are 120. In short, just remember the basic laws of physics. You will only get back what you put into it. In other words, there is no magic wand or wonder product that gives you something for nothing. All light sources have their strengths and weaknesses, and they should be picked according to their application. There is NO wonder product that fits all applications. As a user, if that’s your intention, you will be paying more for something and get less back in return...that’s reality

E.Gastelum says:
Apr-04-2014 05:20 am

What's not discussed and never brought up from someone who comes from a "Lighting Education Center" is enlightening the users. What should be know is that all light sources have their pro's and con's. LEDs have their weakness's too. Heat being one of them, the other is getting enough usable light, in reality "Lumens" do nothing. This is hyped up term that is very hard for the average consumer to ever measure, and it's a number that is bloated by the LED manufacturer. We want to know usable light, how much it lights a surface or a room. I myself come from the electric sign industry and like everything else when it comes to retrofitting here is another "con" for LEDs. Most of the time the user will hear ROI in just a few years. Nothing is further from the truth, most of the time the reality is 20+ years, 40+ in a lot of cases. There is a big reason why big theme parks like Disney have gone from LED back to Neon. One of the biggest marketing terms is "LEDs" are 80% more efficient than T12 lamps, or Neon, or HID lamps. Again, false. When you measure usable light from LEDs vs say...Neon, or HO Fluor Lamps. The comparisons are like putting a penlight to a Maglite and saying the penlight is more efficient. True, it is but it's only putting out a fraction of light as the maglite and then claiming it's more efficient. It's also not fair to take money from tax payers in the form of a rebate and give it so someone who decides to use a lamp over their neighbor. That's stealing from Paul to give to Peter. This gives the false notion that LEDs are cost effective. What they just did was have government pick a winner, not the free market or consumer. LEDs should not be handicapped instead they should stand on their own merit. Mercury, Lead, Glass, just nothing more than environmental scare, or marketing material for the consumer to buy LED. Fact is most inexpensive LEDs are made in China. China has coal plants and it takes more energy to make LEDs than a Neon or Fluorescent lamp...MUCH more and that is putting more mercury into the air than what is contained in a mercury lamp which is all contained in a glass. So it's better to spend 150 watts to save 5 watts from another light source? Since the earlier marketing claims have not worked out so well especially in the electric sign industry where rebates have disappeared, Energy Efficiency in ROI has been debunked as a non factor and mercury is no longer a valid fear factor the new marketing point is "Light Trespass". This one really makes my chuckle. anything to sell I suppose. The reality is and another con for LEDs is, LEDs are angled pinpoint light that does not disperse very well and you need alot of it to light up a room or surface. Neon, Fluorescent, and incandescent lamps have a bigger advantage that they are 360 degree lamps. Most LEDs are 120. In short, just remember the basic laws of physics. You will only get back what you put into it. In other words, there is no magic wand or wonder product that gives you something for nothing. All light sources have their strengths and weaknesses, and they should be picked according to their application. There is NO wonder product that fits all applications. As a user, if that’s your intention, you will be paying more for something and get less back in return...that’s reality

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News

Walmart tests new c-store format, Walmart To Go

BY Staff Writer

New York — Wal-Mart Stores is testing a new convenience-store concept called “Walmart To Go,” with the initial location in the chain’s hometown of Bentonville, Ark.

The new store offers convenience store products, prepared foods and gasoline. At approximately 2,500 sq. ft., Walmart To Go is much smaller than the company’s other small-format concept, Walmart Express, which averages about 15,000 sq. ft.

Walmart also has a grocery delivery service with a similar name, WalmartToGo.com, in two markets.

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