INVENTORY

A Gap brand reaches for the cloud

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

A specialty retailer is streamlining its merchandising operations.

Gap's Intermix division has become the company's first brand to transition to the cloud. The upscale specialty retailer is leveraging Oracle’s cloud-based platform to drive efficiencies across merchandising and inventory management. The platform supports end-to-end operational efficiencies and empowers the business teams among specialty apparel company Intermix.

By moving Intermix to the cloud, the brand will simplify operations and maintain a consistent merchandising platform. The platform will also enable the chain to take advantage of the dynamic, modern functionality and technology offered in the Oracle Retail Cloud Service.

For example, the technology synchronizes end-to-end merchandising operations from buying to inventory valuation — driving a single version of the truth. Daily tasks, such as purchase order approval and sales auditing, also become more efficient since they are supported by exception-based dashboard notifications and alerts.

Both companies worked in tandem to deploy the solution from strategic planning to go-live. Both teams collaborated on the project and tackled any challenges that arose throughout the process, according to Gap.

“This investment marks the first step on a journey to adopting cloud technology across our global operations,” said Paul Chapman, CIO, Gap.

“We chose Oracle Retail Cloud Services to synchronize our global initiatives and deliver state of the art functionality to Intermix,” Chapman said. “The Intermix team is inspired by the potential of the solutions. They look forward to new capabilities and insights delivered by the Oracle Retail solutions.”

In addition to Intermix, Gap Inc. also operates the Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy, Athleta and Weddington Way brands.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
FINANCE

Department store retailer’s attempt to go private stalls

BY CSA STAFF

Nordstrom may not be going private anytime soon.

Attempts by the Nordstrom family to take Nordstrom private have stalled over financing difficulties, reported CNBC. According to the report, banks have become cautious amid today's unstable retail climate.

The Nordstrom family group owns 31.2% of Nordstrom. In June, the family said it was exploring a possible buy-out.

Click here to read the full report.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
MARKETING/SOCIAL MEDIA

Nordstrom unveiling new ‘inclusive’ shopping experience

BY Marianne Wilson

Nordstrom is looking to appeal to a broader audience.

The retailer on Monday called on top brands to expand their size ranges by adding more items in sizes 14, 16 and 18, along with smaller sizes zero and 2. Nordstrom also said that it is launching an "extended sizing" initiative, beginning with its new store at Westfield Century City, Los Angeles.

The initiative will kick off in the denim department, which will feature women's mannequins in varying sizes — rather than the typical size 2 —in the denim department to create what the retailer described as a more inclusive shopping experience.

In addition, Nordstrom is integrating all denim sizes together, putting them side by side in one department rather than separating the petite and plus sizes. Participating brands initially include Topshop, Rag &amp Bone and Madewell as well as the company's private label brands Caslon and Halogen.

Looking futher out, Nordstrom expects to have about 40 brands committed to offering extended sizes in multiple categories online, including swimwear, activewear and ready-to-wear in time for the holiday season, with 60 brands on board for spring 2018. The inclusive in-store experience should be in place in 15 stores by spring.

Nordstrom said is not eliminating its existing plus-size or petite departments. Rather it is working toward filling the gaps in sizes and integrating all sizes together on the selling floor.

"We recognize the opportunity to serve customers better by having more sizes," said Tricia Smith, Nordstrom executive VP and general merchandise manager for designer, women's and kids apparel. "Style and fashion apply to everyone. They're not created for a limited group of sizes. We don't view being size inclusive any differently that the need to be more inclusive across the board — whether it's ethnicity, size or body type. In our opinion, petite and plus sizes shouldn't be considered special categories. They're just sizes."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...