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Global Watch: Top 10 Department Stores

BY Marianne Wilson

What’s your favorite department store? The experts at London-based design consultancy Dalziel and Pow have just come out with their top 10 global department store destinations. It’s an interesting list, with some familiar players, and some less so.

Here are the firm’s picks:

  • Neiman Marcus, Walnut Creek, Calif.: The only U.S. retailer to make the cut, Neiman’s new California outpost is a stunner.
  • Liverpool, Interlomas (Mexico City): Dalziel and Pow calls Liverpool’s newest flagship a “supremely confident and challenging statement” from an ambitious retailer.
  • Lane Crawford, Hong Kong: Described as “high on style, with a real point of difference,” this ultra-modern four-level store is an ultimate luxury destination.
  • Lotte, Seoul: The flagship of Lotte Department Stores, offers “a stand-out experience” in a fast-growing market.”
  • Selfridges, London: Some consider it the world’s coolest department store. I tend to agree. As Dalziel and Pow puts it, “ever evolving, ever surprising.”
  • Bon Marche, Paris: One hundred and sixty years young, and still as fresh and relevant as ever, according to Dalziel and Pow.
  • Holt Renfrew, Toronto: The flagship of one of North American’s most progressive department store retailers, Holt Renfrew is sleek and sophisticated.
  • Illum Bolinghus, Copenhagen: The epitome of Scandinavian cool.
  • Tsutaya Lifestyle Store, Tokyo: A music, books and culture store that provides a rich, immersive environment were customers can lose themselves.
  • Paris, Santiago: Specializing in womenswear, Paris has a “new identity with expressive visual merchandising and a unique design approach” that make it stand out from the competition.”

The Dalziel and Pow Top 10 is just one part of a fascinating read on the future of department stores. Click here to download the full report.


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Ocean Spray appoints global CMO

BY CSA STAFF

LAKEVILLE-MIDDLEBORO, Mass. — Ocean Spray Cranberries has appointed Thano Chaltas to the newly created role of global CMO. He will report directly to Ken Romanzi, SVP and COO of Ocean Spray Brands.

Chaltas will be responsible for global brand development, and a part of the grower-owned cooperative’s leadership team.

“As the world’s leading producer of cranberry juices, juice drinks and dried cranberries, and the best-selling brand in the bottled juice category, Ocean Spray is creating the global CMO position to further leverage our great brands, talent and innovation in order to drive global business growth,” said Randy Papadellis, president and CEO of Ocean Spray. “Thano has more than 20 years of progressive marketing experience with Kraft, WellPet and UST, and I’m confident he will bring strong marketing, strategy and management expertise to the cooperative.”

Prior to his appointment at Ocean Spray, Chaltas served as CMO at WellPet, LLC, a producer and marketer of premium, natural food for pets. Chaltas was responsible for all aspects of marketing, including brand management, new product innovation, marketing research, marketing services and consumer affairs. He successfully drove record revenue and growing market share across all brands; led the creation of new products that were a significant contributor to growth by implementing a rigorous stage and gate new product development process; launched the company’s first ever national advertising campaign; and developed new brands in partnership with Target stores. In addition to his marketing responsibilities, he also served as interim head of sales and led a staff of about 70 sales people and 21 marketers.

Chaltas also spent 13 years at Kraft Foods Group Inc. in roles with increasing brand and customer marketing responsibilities across several divisions including beverage, snacks, coffee and cereal. He worked on alliances with top media and sports properties and managed highly visible brands including Post, Kool-Aid and Maxwell House.

“I look forward to working with the iconic grower-owned cooperative and its portfolio of great-tasting, good-for-you products,” said Chaltas. “I plan to utilize my knowledge and experience to grow Ocean Spray’s global brand presence, deliver innovative new products that are consistent with today’s consumer lifestyles and attract new loyal customers across the country and the world.”

Chaltas earned an undergraduate degree from Brown University and an M.B.A. in marketing, finance and organizational behavior from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

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Back-to-School Special

BY Jeff Green

I’m sure I’m not the only one who has some pretty vivid memories of back- to-school shopping: getting dragged out alongside my mother to buy new outfits and a few No. 2 pencils. Now, it seems like everyone in the retail world is finding a way to join the party.

In recent years, a number of new and perhaps unexpected retailers have thrown their hats into the back-to-school ring in some interesting and creative ways. In a space that used to be reserved for a fairly select group of retailers (primarily child and teen apparel retailers and larger discount stores), the entry of some new national names has shaken up the back-to-school landscape.

Today, specialty retailers are joining mass merchants and apparel retailers in the back-to-school pool. While the degree to which they have done so successfully is up for debate — and the quality of execution varies significantly from one brand to the next — it’s an unmistakable trend. I think what’s happening is that many specialty retailers have concluded that they need to come up with their own back-to-school angle if they are going to tap into the annual late-summer/early-fall shopping frenzy. For the average family, that commercial activity is no small expense: the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) reports that “the average household expenditure on all types of back-to-school items is expected to be about $285 this year,” with 84% of consumers planning to spend the same or more than they did last year.

It’s no surprise to see mass merchants like Target and Wal-Mart deploying extensive back-to-school promotions, marketing initiatives and collateral materials. Both brands have special website sections, promotions, and special resources for both back-to-school and back-to-college shopping. What is more of an eye-opener is what a company like Bed Bath & Beyond has done. The Shop for College section on the Bed Bath & Beyond website (which is prominently featured as one of three main tabs on the site’s homepage) includes a detailed shopping checklist, school-themed retail categories — sleep, eat, wash, study, organize, relax — a series of 12 videos on college- and dorm-themed practical solutions, a school locator, a dorm room decorating organizer, and even a college gift registry!

Bed Bath & Beyond might be the specialty retailer who has made the most significant effort to carve out their own space in the back-to-school shopping landscape, but they are far from the only one. Ikea has introduced its own promotions and dedicated website section, complete with a back-to-school checklist and thoughtfully presented shopping categories. Apple recently launched its new Back to School promotion, which rewards “qualified educational purchasers iTunes Store/App Store/iBookstore gift cards of up to $100 with the purchase of a new Mac, iPad, or iPhone.” The initiative also includes in-store signage and collateral materials such as a brochure-style “checklist” of back-to-school items and accessories. Best Buy is offering special discounts on laptops, PCs and printers. Even Pottery Barn Kids’ offerings include a detailed article outlining all the different things parents can do to help prepare their kids for school.

I think part of this push on the part of retailers to enter the back-to-school marketplace is a reflection of the fact that what you buy for your back-to-school needs has changed somewhat (electronics occupy an increasingly significant piece of the back-to-school pie, for example), but I think it’s mostly just intelligent, aggressive and sophisticated marketing and product positioning.

While more deals and back-to-school options would seem to be a good thing for parents and kids, it might be an even better development for brick-and-mortar retail in general. Bold and creative moves like this are what retailers have to do to stay relevant and capture more market share. And while it might seem like they might simply siphon off some of the back-to-school dollars that would otherwise be spent at traditional back-to-school retailers, I don’t think that’s much of a worry. The kinds of retailers and products pushing to enter the marketplace aren’t necessarily direct competition, and I see most of this new retail activity as created potential: new dollars that might otherwise have stayed unspent in the wallets and pocketbooks of parents.

Pop quiz: What’s your take on the back-to-school trends? Which of these retailers would you give a passing grade to, and which do we need to send home with “Needs Improvement” on their report cards? Leave a comment below or send your thoughts to [email protected] to keep the conversation going.


Click here for past columns by Jeff Green.

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B.Kelly says:
Jul-24-2013 02:31 pm

A lot is being written about Back To School (BTS) and I think your sentence nicely sums it up: I think it’s mostly just intelligent, aggressive and sophisticated marketing and product positioning. Here's a few of things to keep in mind. 1. BTS is a three phase promotion period College to High School/ Middle School to Elementary School I have two kids, now they are in college. College starts early in August, unless the institution is on quarters then it starts later in September. In going freshman, in particular girls and their mothers, begin planning the decoration of the room as soon as they find out roommates. High schools begin after college kids are safely ensconsed and fashion is a big deal for high school, and so planning that first week contour has fashionistas buying in advance. Elementary kids are outfitted by moms with a "wear now" attitude. Middle school is exactly that. 2. College expands basket beyond apparel and school supplies aka office products categories Those Martha Stewarts in training move on from her first dorm. Her sorority room is next and then her first apartment. Each year presents a new home canvas upon which she explores her increasing mature sense of style. Bed Bath and Beyond has created the best mouse trap. As parents, we can shop in our local store verifying smart buys are made, and BBB will ensure the college town's BBB has those items on hold when we pull into campus. WMT and TGT keep improving but they remain behind BBB for this ease of home outfitting. 3. BTS leads to Holiday Retail calendars are circular, one shopping period flows directly into the next and all can predispose her outlet preference if done right. Holiday has two phases: 1. Home prep, 2. Gifting. BTS synchs with our life shift from outside to inside. Dorm outfitting puts Moms in store when fall palates and life transition are landing. Converting her then can encourage another visit later for Halloween and then Thanksgiving. BTS outfitting feels a bit like a "gifting" moment. While these purchases seem mundane and rational, there is a "gift" in each special binder, book bag, bedding set and even first apartment outfitting. So BTS marketing is intelligent - the market is moving; aggressive - a strong Q3 definitely takes the pressure off Holiday; sophisticated - converting Q3 traffic for Q4 buying and building loyalty with emerging home consumers. Hope this helps. Brian

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