STORE SPACES

Ikea’s solar system in Centennial, Col., store goes live

BY CSA STAFF

Centennial, Col. — Ikea on Tuesday officially plugged-in the solar energy system installed at its upcoming location in Centennial, Col. (the 415,000-sq.-ft. store is due to open on July 27).

The 60,000-sq.-ft. array consists of a 498-kW system, built with 2,212 panels. It will produce approximately 740,000 kWh of electricity annually, the equivalent of reducing at least 564 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2), eliminating the emissions of 100 cars or powering 62 homes yearly.

The project – the largest single-use rooftop array on a commercial building in Colorado – will contribute to the local utility’s renewable portfolio goals and lower the carbon intensity of the electrical grid. Ikea contracted with California-based REC Solar, one of the largest U.S. solar electric providers, which specializes in grid-tied solar electric design and installation.

With this latest effort, Ikea now has six solar programs in the United States with installations pending at eight other stores. The Centennial local also will be the first U.S. Ikea store to incorporate a geothermal system for heating/cooling the building.

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Safeway in DC earns LEED certification

BY CSA STAFF

New York City — Safeway’s store in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C, has earned LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. The 71,067-sq.ft. store is the grocer’s second LEED-certified store, and the first LEED certified store in DC.

The store’s green building elements sunshade screens to reduce solar heat gain, and a storm water drainage system that collects and filters on site runoff from the parking lot and roof. It also features water efficient landscaping, including the use of drip irrigation with a landscape irrigation system water diverted from public sewer system by reuse of defrost waste water. Drought-tolerant native plants that require little or no irrigation help reduce the use of water.

Additional sustainable elements include:

  • White “TPO” roofing, which reduces the heat island effect and decreases cooling requirements for the store;
  • LED lighting in exterior signs, which reduce energy consumption by 80% or more compared to standard neon signs;
  • No CFC refrigerants. Safeway exclusively uses R-507 in its refrigeration systems, an HFC refrigerant with low ozone depletion potential;
  • Protocol-distributed refrigeration systems, which places the compressors closer to the various loads around the store to reduce the amount of copper piping in one store by about 35%. It also reduces the refrigerant charge by approximately 30%; and
  • Centralized HVAC system, using R-410a, which is more energy efficient than R-22 and has zero ozone depletion potential.

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Smith’s honored for energy efficiency

BY CSA STAFF

New York City — Smith’s Food & Drug Stores, a division of Kroger Co., has been recognized by the Utah Association of Energy Users as a leader in conservation and energy-use efficiency, The Salt Lake Tribune reported.

The chain, which received the “Outstanding Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Conservation” award on Wednesday at the 26th Annual Western States Energy Conference in Salt Lake City, was recognized for retrofitting its 132 stores in seven states with more efficient energy systems.

A recent energy-savings change converted frozen food cases from fluorescent lighting to LED lighting. Smith’s anticipates saving as much electricity as it takes to power 1,838 single-family homes in Utah for one year through that measure alone, it said in a statement.

The association is comprised of business executives who are interested in energy efficiency, policy and technical issues, as well as regulatory staff from western states, legislators and utility representatives. Members spend over $400 million annually on energy, and provide 40,000 technical jobs to Utahns.

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