REAL ESTATE

Mixing It Up

BY Katherine Boccaccio

As is true with so many shopping center formats, there are a myriad of definitions for mixed use. The most rigid is that a mixed-use development must be limited only to buildings with a mix of uses. One study suggests that the definition includes sites with a mix of uses, whether these are in adjacent parts of a block of buildings or in separate parts of the site. Other definitions restrict it to those mixed use projects initiated by a single developer; still others say the uses must be segregated by roads or landscaping.

Indeed, even the developers—some of the most creative mixed-use thinkers in the country—interviewed for this special real estate supplement to Chain Store Age had mixed definitions for the concept. But all 15 did agree that, despite how you define it, mixed use is the format most prolifically developed today. And for good reason.

The consumer preference for the intuitive mix of site planning and variety that is at the core of mixed use can’t be ignored. People like the experiences provided by a place that offers up a variety of things to do.

Place-making isn’t just about building beauty. While it’s true that mixed-use projects—particularly those that incorporate Main Streets and town centers—are inherently attractive, it’s the addition of varied activities that truly draws consumers. In some mixed-use developments, you can shop and work. In others you can live and shop. And in almost all you can eat and see a movie. The mixed-use vision is broad—and it works.

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Coca-Cola names chief marketer

BY CSA STAFF

ATLANTA The Coca-Cola Company has appointed Joseph Tripodi to the position of chief marketing and commercial officer, reporting to president and coo Muhtar Kent. Most recently, Tripodi was the senior vp and chief marketing officer for Allstate Insurance Co., where he was responsible for the structure, strategy and execution of all of their marketing efforts.

In his role, Tripodi will lead a new function consisting of the combination of the company’s global marketing and commercial organizations. In addition to overseeing all aspects of marketing, he will be responsible for coordinating and leading the company’s strategic direction in commercial leadership.

Prior to joining Allstate in 2003, Tripodi was chief marketing officer for The Bank of New York. He served as chief marketing officer for Seagram Spirits & Wine Group from 1999 to 2002. From 1989 to 1998, he was the evp for global marketing, products and services for MasterCard International, where among other achievements he was a chief architect of the acclaimed “Priceless” campaign. Previously, he spent seven years with the Mobil Oil Corp., where he gained considerable international experience in roles of increasing responsibility in planning, marketing, business development and operations in New York, Paris, Hong Kong and Guam.

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Whole Foods takes top spot on EPA list

BY CSA STAFF

WASHINGTON Whole Foods Market took the top spot this quarter on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Top 10 Retail Partners in its Green Power Partnership program. Other major retailers on the list include Kohl’s (2), Staples (4), Lowe’s (6) and Office Depot.

According to its profile on the EPA Web site, currently, Whole Foods Market is purchasing or generating 100% of its total national power load from green power sources.

The Top 10 Retail Partners in the Green Power Partnership is released quarterly and represents the largest completed annual green power purchases of all Retail Partners within the Green Power Partnership. According to the EPA, the combined green power purchases of these organizations amounts to an estimated 1.4 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually, which is the equivalent amount of electricity needed to power more than 140,000 average American homes each year.

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