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Nautilus announces new appointments

BY CSA STAFF

VANCOUVER, Wash. Nautilus has announced four new appointments as part of a restructuring plan directed by Bob Falcone, the company’s recently appointed president and ceo.

“Our restructuring requires the hiring and alignment of new talent with relevant expertise along with leveraging the excellent talent base that already resides in the company,” said Falcone. “We strongly believe that a matrix style of organization with a new emphasis on product lifecycle profitability will position us well for global growth while improving upon execution and results from our business plans.”

James Heidenreich joins the company Dec. 3 as senior vp of global marketing and chief marketing officer, reporting to Falcone.  He brings more than 15 years of brand marketing experience. Since 2004, he was vp of marketing for Riddell Sports Group.  Prior to that, he was group vp of marketing for Experimental and Applied Sciences (EAS).

The company also appointed Aaron Brotherton as director of direct response TV and Creative Development, beginning Dec. 10 and reporting to Heidenreich.  Brotherton was vp of creative development for Razor & Tie Entertainment in New York, where he developed direct response creative for a string of Billboard-topping videos and CDs. 

Caroline Howe has been appointed senior vp, general manager and begins Dec. 3. She joins from the Portland office of Irvine, Calif.-based American Sporting Goods Corp. where she led the reinvention of Ryka, a 20-year-old women’s footwear and apparel brand.

Kenneth Fish begins his role as senior vp, general manager Dec. 3.  He currently serves as vp of global finance. While at Nautilus, he has reorganized the accounting function following an ERP system conversion, oversaw continuous improvement, and directed the pending acquisition of Xiamen-based Land America, the company’s largest contract manufacturer. 

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Sears makes offer for Restoration Hardware

BY CSA STAFF

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. Sears Holdings reported in an SEC filing today that it had sent a letter to the special committee of the board of directors of Restoration Hardware, in which it proposed a tender offer to purchase the company’s shares for $6.75 per share, and that it would contemplate entering into a merger agreement. In the letter, Sears also sought to enter into a confidentiality agreement with Restoration Hardware.

According to Sears Holdings, after sending the Nov. 23 letter, its representatives, along with representatives from Restoration Hardware met to discuss Sears’ proposal. On Nov. 25, 2007, the special committee of Restoration Hardware informed Sears Holdings that it was unwilling to enter into a confidentiality agreement providing for the superior tender offer exception sought by Sears Holdings.

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N.J. could be first state to ban plastic bags

BY CSA STAFF

TRENTON, N.J. New Jersey Assemblymen Herb Conaway, M.D., and Jack Conners introduced a bill this week that calls for the removal of plastic bags from New Jersey retailers over the next three years. The bill also seeks to create legislation that will limit the use of non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags through mandatory instore recycling programs for retail outlets with a minimum 10,000 square feet of space.

The bill, entitled the “Plastic Bag Recycling Act,” would make New Jersey the first state in the country to eventually ban plastic grocery bags, according to the assemblymen.

“We need to get these bags out of the waste stream because they are polluting our soil and our water,” said Conaway (D-Burlington, Camden). “Plastic bags may be cheap and convenient, but they have costly longterm environmental consequences that just can’t be ignored.”

Under the measure, retail stores would need to reduce their use of plastic bags by 50%  by Dec. 31, 2009 and eliminate their use entirely by Dec. 31, 2010.

In March, San Francisco became the first city in the U.S. to pass a law banning the use of plastic bags from large supermarkets. In July, the state of California enacted a law that requires large stores to take back plastic bags and encourage their reuse. The New York City Council also has introduced legislation calling for the recycling of plastic bags.

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