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The Nook is Dead, Long Live Barnes & Noble

BY Dan Berthiaume

Betamax. Zune. Google Plus. These are just a few consumer technology applications that hit the market with a lot of hype and all failed to catch on for the same basic reason. It seems clear that the Barnes & Noble Nook e-reader tablet can now be considered part of this list, although Barnes & Noble has not yet accepted it.

The reason technologies like Nook and Zune failed to engage the consumer marketplace is that a competing device monopolized the space. VHS, iPod and Facebook did not leave enough room for Betamax, Zune and Google Plus, and the Amazon Kindle has become the de facto e-reading device for mainstream consumers. This type of market domination occurs for a whole host of reasons that rarely reflect upon the quality of the technology being squeezed out (Betamax in particular is generally seen as superior to VHS), but nonetheless makes competition futile.

Time to bid e-readers adieu

Barnes & Noble has partially recognized the difficulty Nook is having competing with Kindle by announcing plans to spin Nook off a separate company, but would be better served by accepting reality and exiting the e-reader market altogether. This would be the first of several IT-related steps Barnes & Noble should take to turn things around. Two other steps include:

Accept Amazon’s e-book dominance

Barnes & Noble’s insistence on hanging on to the Nook is part of a larger attempt to try to capture a larger share of the e-book market from Amazon.com. It won’t happen. Barnes & Noble can stay in the e-book space, but needs to realize that its future success does not hinge on e-book sales or even digital sales of physical books.

Rather than trying to beat Amazon at a game Amazon invented and continues to perfect, Barnes & Noble should refocus on its own game, serving the needs of dedicated readers who enjoy the physical experience of browsing and buying physical books. This is a shrinking but still vital market, and while Barnes & Noble may need to look at consolidating or closing stores, customers who find the Amazon experience dissatisfying are still its best hope. Better serving them will require Barnes & Noble to…

Refine and localize assortments

Amazon can only present a limited number of books to each site visitor, and despite advanced personalization cannot satisfy the needs of a browser who prefers to handle and examine a large number of books. Barnes & Noble can make its hands-on browsing experience more appealing by using advanced assortment planning systems to focus more on regional authors, books about local history, and other works of specific area interest. The retailer should also broaden its assortment to include more small press, older and “cult classic” books that are not typically promoted by Amazon but have positive social and online reader reviews and commentary.

Barnes & Noble is already doing some things to leverage its physical store advantage, such as offering in-store pickup of online purchases and in-store kiosks that simplify searches and increase access to inventory. But by recognizing the turf Amazon has already won and using analytics to improve its in-store assortments, Barnes & Noble can avoid the fate of Borders and win at its own game.


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Canada’s Supreme Court rules against Wal-Mart over store closing

BY Marianne Wilson

New York — The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that Wal-Mart violated Quebec labor law by closing its store in Jonquiere, Quebec, in 2005.

In a 5-2 decision announced on Friday, the court ruled that the 190 employees who were terminated when the store was closed are entitled to compensation, according to CBC Montreal.

The closing came shortly after the United Food and Commercial Workers union was certified to represent the store’s workers in 2004. The store eventually closed in spring 2005, putting the 190 employees out of work. Wal-Mart said the store was not profitable. It has maintained that it did not close the store because it was being unionized.

This marked the union’s second time at bringing the retail giant into court over the store closing. In 2009, the Supreme Court ruled that the employees’ freedom of association rights were not violated when the company decided to close the store.

In 2013, however, the union filed a new appeal with the Supreme Court in which it argued that Wal-Mart violated a provision of the Quebec labor code by changing the workers’ conditions of employment without consent while the terms of the collective agreement were being negotiated, the report said. The court found Wal-Mart did not adequately prove the four-year-old store was in financial difficulty.

The court sent the case to an arbitrator to determine remedies, which will likely include compensation for the workers.

"We will review the decision carefully in order to determine what our next steps will be," Alex Roberton, Wal-Mart Canada’s director of corporate affairs, said in an email to CBC Montreal.

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IBM study: Mobile to play major role in online holiday shopping

BY Dan Berthiaume

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Armonk, N.Y. – Mobile will continue to play a significant and dominating role in online shopping this holiday season. According to the IBM Retail Holiday Readiness Report, mobile sales for both smartphones and tablets reached a high of 19.1% of all site sales in December 2013, up three-fold from December 2011.

Mobile site traffic reached a record of 38.2% in March 2014, more than double that of March 2012. As a result, the IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark predicts these figures to continue to rise, with mobile accounting for more than 20% of site sales and more than 43% of site traffic to come November 2014.

To succeed this holiday season, IBM advises that retailers will need to pay attention to both device type and operating system to better focus their mobile app and analytics investments, while at the same time ensuring a flawless customer experience between devices and operating systems.

Other highlights of the report, compiled from the cloud-based IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark, include:

• Consumers spending more dollars online: Average order value (AOV) and items per order both reached new three-year highs according to the IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark. In terms of online spending, increases in AOV and items per order suggest retailers are savvier than ever when it comes to delivering a streamlined online shopping experience – making it easy for consumers to find items and providing an enticing brand experience. To capitalize on this trend, heading into the holidays, retailers will need to rely on personalization and cross-sell recommendations to further strengthen customer relationships and wallets, the report said.

• Consumer attention spans dwindle: Fueled by the growth of mobile users, who make quick visits to retail sites, online retailers saw average time on site sink to a new low in September 2013 of just 7:09. Page views per session also hit a new bottom of 6.93 in March 2014, two fewer pages than the same period in 2012.

For retailers, this means that, ultimately, shoppers have little tolerance for poor customer experiences – if they can’t find what they need, they’re moving on.

To ensure a seamless customer experience this holiday, marketers should consider investing in customer experience management technologies to identify customer struggle and quickly resolve onsite problems, which can lead to lost revenue, according to the report. And to enhance the visitor experience, marketers and retailers might consider improving site navigation, providing useful content like how-to guides and user forums, as well as ensuring a consistent brand image across channels.

Click here for the full report.

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