OPERATIONS

Report: Target continues internal IT focus

BY Dan Berthiaume

Target Corp. is making a number of aggressive moves to become more self-reliant when it comes to IT development.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the latest move is the adoption of the DevOps software development strategy. DevOps emphasizes increased cooperation among software engineers and product deployment employees, and also focuses on agile development and testing methods.

While some Target IT employees had been informally utilizing DevOps strategies for a few years, new CIO Mike McNamara has been more formally adopting the approach since he came on board in February. McNamara has even created an internal DevOps incubator called Dojo, and also offered hands-on workshops for senior-level IT executives.

The switch to DevOps falls under Target’s broader $1 billion effort to revitalize its technology infrastructure. Among the benefits DevOps offers is a reduction in need for IT outsourcing, which has also been a major focus of Target this year.

Other steps to reduce the need for IT outsourcing include Target’s recent call for applications to a new retail technology accelerator it will run next year in partnership with technology accelerator TechStars. While companies that participate in the accelerator will not necessarily receive investment from or be acquired by Target, one of the retailer’s stated goals is to learn about quick, innovative development techniques from start-ups.

In addition, Target plans on hiring 1,000 new global technology workers with modern technology skills like agile development, to focus on open-source development of mobile and online tools. Although Target has traditionally outsourced close to half its IT workforce, the retailer wants to bring technology development in-house to better take advantage of proprietary knowledge and applications.

Target seeks to hire about 500 IT workers at its Minneapolis headquarters and 500 at its technology facility in Bangalore, India.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
MOBILITY

Study: The most likely time for online fraud is…

BY Dan Berthiaume

Online fraudsters apparently do not keep nine-to-five hours.

According to a new study from fraud detection technology provider Sift Science, “The United States of Fraud,” online transactions conducted at 3 a.m. are most likely to be fraudulent.

The high likelihood of fraud at 3 a.m. occurs across all time zones. Also, fraudsters are more likely to transact during the weekdays.

Looking at states where suspicious activity is more likely to occur, the study finds that Alaska has the highest fraud rate based on billing address, while Delaware has the highest fraud rate based on shipping address.

In contrast, the Midwest has the lowest rate of fraud based on both shipping and billing addresses. However, Massachusetts has the overall lowest rate of fraud.

There are also differences in likelihood for online fraud by gender and age. Men are slightly more likely to be fraudsters than women. And users identifying themselves in the 85-90 age range are two and-a-half times more likely to be fraudsters than the average user.

Other notable findings include:

• A user with two to four accounts linked to one device is eight times more likely to be fraudulent.

• Purchases worth $0-25 are twice as likely to be fraudulent, suggesting criminals test stolen credits cards for validity, trying low-value orders.

• Accounts less than three days old are three times more likely to be fraudulent, while accounts that are two months old are two times more likely to be fraudulent.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
MOBILITY

Amazon.com is increasing its holiday workforce by 25%

BY Gina Acosta

Amazon.com is increasing the number of workers it is hiring for the holidays this year to meet an increase in customer demand, revealing a possible shift in the way consumers shop.

The retailer says it plans to hire more than 100,000 seasonal employees this year. It hired 80,000 seasonal employees in 2014.

“We’ve hired more than 25,000 full-time associates across the U.S. in recent months and we’re looking forward to adding 100,000 seasonal employees for the upcoming holiday season,” said Mike Roth, Amazon’s vice president of North America operations. “Following last year’s holiday season, tens of thousands of seasonal employees found regular, full-time roles with Amazon. We’re excited to grow our team by finding great talent through our seasonal hiring efforts in addition to creating new full-time jobs that offer comprehensive benefits starting on day one.”

Amazon has more than 90,000 full-time employees across its more than 50 fulfillment centers and 20 sortation centers in the U.S. To meet customer demand and prepare for the 2015 holiday season, Amazon has hired over 25,000 full-time employees since August. Throughout the year on average, nearly 90 percent of associates across the company’s U.S. fulfillment network are regular, full-time employees.

Walmart is hiring 60,000 holiday employees, Target about 70,000 and Macy's 85,000, which are all about flat compared with last year. Kohl's, J.C. Penney and Toys ”R” Us are hiring fewer, while GameStop is hiring about 12% more workers.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...