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Report: Wal-Mart CEO compensation rose 14% to $20.7 million in 2012

BY Marianne Wilson

New York — Wal-Mart Stores CEO Mike Duke received pay package in 2012 worth $20.7 million, up 14% from the previous year, according to an Associated Press analysis of a regulatory filing Monday. Duke’s performance-based cash bonus jumped more than 50%.

In the regulatory filing, Wal-Mart said that starting this year, it will tie some of Duke’s compensation, along with that of other top executives, to the company’s success in strengthening its compliance controls. Traditionally, compensation has been based on financial measures.

Duke received a base salary of $1.3 million, up 4% from the year-ago period, along with stock awards of $13.6 million, also up 4%. His performance-based cash bonus increased to $4.4 million from $2.9 million, according to the report.

Duke’s other compensation amounted to $644,450, up from $377,258 in the previous year. The perks included $101,947 for the use of the company aircraft. He also received $644,450 in above market interest credited on deferred compensation.

The Associated Press formula calculates an executive’s total compensation during the last fiscal year by adding salary, bonuses, perks, above-market interest that the company pays on deferred compensation and the estimated value of stock and stock options awarded during the year. It does not count changes in the present value of pension benefits.

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Lineup for Next Great Consumer Brands Conference announced

BY CSA STAFF

BOSTON, Mass. — Consensus and the world’s largest exchange company, NASDAQ OMX Group, have announced keynote speakers, presenters and special presentations for the third annual Next Great Consumer Brands Conference to be held May 1 at the NASDAQ MarketSite in Times Square, N.Y.

Together with NASDAQ, Consensus, a boutique investment bank focused on the retail and consumer products industries, has organized the daylong event. They’ve invited companies to describe their businesses and present their products to an audience of private equity investors, venture capital firms, angel investors and commercial lenders who invest in, lend to or otherwise finance companies in the consumer product space. Those attending the conference will also be able to sample products from several up-and-coming specialty food and beverage brands.

The program will also include two keynote addresses, two special presentations, a luncheon and a networking cocktail session. Keynote addresses will be delivered by Kevin Plank, founder and CEO of UnderArmour, and entrepreneur and fashion and fitness icon, Kathy Ireland.

Among the Next Great Consumer Brands presenting on May 1 will be EvoShield Mission AthleteCare Thymes, HEX, Nectar Mobile, Power/Lilliputian Systems, Troy Lee Designs, Karmaloop Orbotix Vietri, J. Hilburn Snow Joe Xcel Brands/Isaac Mizrahi and Kitson Spartan Race.

In addition to the presenting companies and the keynote addresses, there will be special presentations from the new NASDAQ Private Market, which will provide improved access to liquidity for early investors, founders and employees while enabling the efficient buying and selling of private company shares, and Circle Up, a crowdfunding platform where accredited investors can make equity investments in up-and-coming consumer products businesses.

Food and beverage brands participating at the conference include Allagash Brewing Company, Hammer + Sickle Vodka, UNREAL Candy, Maia Yogurt, Pirate’s Booty, KIND Bars, HINT Water and AWAKE! Chocolate. The Next Great Consumer Brands event is open to members of the private equity, venture capital, angel investor, commercial lending and commercial finance community.

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J.C. Penney Lesson No. 1: Know Your Customer

BY CSA STAFF

By Leslie Hand, research director, IDC Retail Insights

Ron Johnson’s highly publicized short tenure at J.C. Penney, or JCP, as it was rebranded, will certainly make it into the textbooks and graduate theses on what to do and what not to do when undertaking a significant retail business transformation. The primary failure was not putting customer needs first in what promised to be an excellent long term strategy. Oops — forget the customer in an omni-channel customer strategy?

What a colossal mistake!

The long-term strategy was good, but execution failed at the outset. If only — if only — the first step wasn’t so blatantly ill informed and poorly executed. That step, of course, being the move to Fair and Square pricing without making sure the customer would keep coming to the store if regular discounting and promotions suddenly vanished. This step failed because customers have been trained to be driven to shop because of promotions.

U.S. retailers created this environment, and many would like to turn back time, and create loyalty without discounting, and I would like to think that one day more retailers will achieve this. Some have – think Costco – pricing at Costco is essentially fair and square — fixed markups based on cost, and customers love it and are very comfortable putting things in their carts that they never intended to buy without doing mobile price comparisons. But Costco’s business model is different and customers understand it and like it and embrace it. Costco didn’t change how they go to market overnight.

What J.C. Penney should have done / what they can still do?

JCP should have executed a bit more like Macy’s, competing strongly year over year, always very cognizant of meeting market expectations while fully embracing omni-channel, and making very deliberate moves towards higher levels of omni-channel engagement. Macy’s, moving very visibly towards omni-channel, started with reorganizing the business around the omni-channel customer experience and building the supporting infrastructure.

Macy’s MOM strategy, which stands for My Macy’s localization, Omni-channel, and MAGIC selling is a holistic omni-channel strategy designed to enable in Macy’s words "extraordinary service to customers". Under the covers, the Macy’s program is driving towards increasing visibility and intelligent utilization of data. In the Manhattan Herald Square store, RFID and mobile devices have combined to create an amazing capability in the women’s shoe department where the customer not only gets better service, but the sales staff is well equipped to find and supply the products customers want. If the product is available anywhere in the visible network which includes the DC’s and hundreds of stores, Macy’s can satisfy customer need immediately.

When the product isn’t available, Macy’s could electronically capture what isn’t found. Imagine the power to improve service when we can quantitatively define with precision what we didn’t have in the physical store, and subsequent lost sales and loyalty caused by out of stocks. Valuable data is also being sourced from improved social listening systems, further improving Macy’s ability to meet customer needs.

And like many other high profile omni-channel retailers Macy’s is testing a variety of technologies to further engage and delight the consumer, including Beauty Spot, virtual concierge, Google wallet, PayPal self checkout, mobile POS and virtual manikins. The manikins rely on strong common content management capabilities shared with other digital systems, another cornerstone of a good strategy — strong infrastructure, integration and governance.

I’d argue that Ron Johnson could have been successful if he had built this new environment first, giving the customer a new reason to be loyal, creating an engaging omni-channel environment that would draw them to JCP. Pricing policies could have changed later, over time – definitely not overnight.

All this of course, sounds like hindsight now, but certainly wasn’t through the years as we have advised other retail clients to define how they will differentiate going forward, and invest in transforming their organizations to compete successfully for the omni-channel consumer dollar. The formula for success always depends on who the retailer ultimately wants to be in the eyes of their customer, and well thought out strategic moves executed with foresight of the consequences of missteps, and a plan to recalibrate quickly should one overstep.

At stake, the ability to Increase sales, inventory turns and return on invested capital, in much the same way that Macy’s and others like Nordstrom’s are proceeding. A big opportunity lost for Ron Johnson, but hopefully not for JCP.


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S.Anderson says:
May-29-2013 09:53 am

The main mistake is that people who are going to run their own business are not aware of all nuances of certain business and very often mistakes appeared in weak points like bad service. People don’t like to wait and to be ignored especially if they are in an expensive place like restaurant or so. I want to add that really good service can defuse a lot of disadvantages like comfortless place or even bad cuisine. Payday loans in Alberta for instance used to be very unpopular organization, but thanks to its quick service they are on the top positions. Every business is possible to start, though it takes a lot of efforts to continue.

S.Anderson says:
May-29-2013 09:53 am

The main mistake is that people who are going to run their own business are not aware of all nuances of certain business and very often mistakes appeared in weak points like bad service. People don’t like to wait and to be ignored especially if they are in an expensive place like restaurant or so. I want to add that really good service can defuse a lot of disadvantages like comfortless place or even bad cuisine. Payday loans in Alberta for instance used to be very unpopular organization, but thanks to its quick service they are on the top positions. Every business is possible to start, though it takes a lot of efforts to continue.

V.Souz says:
Apr-24-2013 09:51 am

Great post, recently came across this very interesting audio cast and whitepaper on retail growth strategies "Thinking about tomorrow: Post-recession strategies for retailers" It offers very good information on consumer trends, multi channel marketing , readers will find it useful @ http://bit.ly/10XoIQa

J.River says:
Apr-24-2013 06:59 am

Shopping those mini stores is a nightmare, example toaster, well hope you like a choice of one in that Graves store, $70, looks like bread. A store the size of a JCP made up of 100 mini shops is dysfunctional, can you imagine Walmart stocking its groceries this way, you want tuna, well, go to the StarKist mini shop. Want to compare price on other brands of tuna, good luck, you might find it in another mini store somewhere in the store. You ever look at a Bed Bath & Beyond? How they arrange stuff, grouped by type, with brands beside each other, bursting at the seams with merchazdise? Check their stocks, their growth, this year. Ron's vision was one big pipe dream. The new parts of JCP is minimalistically stocked by design with crap no one needs and it would appear, wants. JCP has the following hope, rip out as much as possible those mini stores, or reduce the damage, get it done by October, pray to some deity for Christmas. If Christmas fails expect nothing more than an oil slick left. Ron will have "Ron Johnsoned" JCP into history.

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