STORE SPACES

Sprouts Farmers Markets taps Verisae for improved operations and lowered facility costs

BY Marianne Wilson

Minneapolis — Sprouts Farmers Market has installed enterprise asset management software from Verisae to support the company’s aggressive growth strategy.

The grocery retailer, which recently acquired Sunflower Farmers Market, recently implemented core modules of the Verisae connected facility platform; enterprise asset management (EAM), enterprise refrigerant management (ERM) and enterprise asset purchasing (EAP) solutions.

“Sprouts has had a long, successful history of sustainability, from energy conservation to industry leading low refrigerant leak rates,” said Jerry Stutler, VP construction and facility engineering for Sprouts, which operates more than 140 supermarkets in eight southwestern state. “But we recognized, especially as we grow through acquisition, that we can do more to streamline our maintenance, energy and refrigerant management processes. Adopting Verisae’s platform was the logical next step, and it’s already producing results.”

With Verisae, Sprouts will aggregate and analyze data on the entire lifecycle of their assets including equipment procurement, parts and inventory tracking, remote monitoring of asset efficiency and management of third-party service contractors.

The software also will help Sprouts provide the foundation to create connected facilities that reduce operational costs and a more sustainable organization, and also to comply with the stringent EPA regulations, according to Verisae. The EPA requires every organization that uses refrigerants as part of its operation to be fully compliant with Section 608 of the Clean Air Act.

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STORE SPACES

J.C. Penney employs mannequins to fill empty space

BY Staff Writer

New York — As new CEO Ron Johnson works to transition the “old” J.C. Penney into a new era filled with shop-in-shops, he and his team have devised a way to keep the store looking fresh during the changeover: they use a lot of mannequins.

Read full story here.

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STORE SPACES

Top Must-See Stores … New York City Edition

BY Marianne Wilson

From ultra-lux boutiques to fast-fashion emporiums, New York City saw an influx of new stores this past year. Here’s Chain Store Age editor Marianne Wilson’s list of top new must-see stores in the city:

Aritzia: At 13,000-sq.-ft., this is the Canadian on-trend apparel retailer’s largest store in the world. The design, according to the company, revolves around a “metaphysical theme inspired by natural phenomena.” Fittingly, there is an installation of giant mushrooms — hand carved from cherry wood — just inside the entry. One of them is 30 ft. tall, extends from the lower level of the store, and serves as a canopy over the lounge on the upper level. (600 Fifth Ave.)

Burton Snowboard: Burton’s renovated SoHo flagship is a showcase for the brand’s homey New England image. Featured elements include a vintage chairlift, a wood cabin made from reclaimed timbers and a snowboard fabrication press. (106 Spring St.)

C. Wonder: The brand’s second Manhattan location is even more whimsical and colorful than the first. With decor that includes polka-dot horses, multicolored striped zebras and 6-ft. logo teddy bears, the 8,000-sq.-ft. store personifies C. Wonder’s fun, upbeat personality. (Shops at Columbus Circle, 18 Columbus Circle)

Fivestory: Inspired by the Paris concept shop Colette, this is an upscale, one-of-a-kind luxury emporium that sells clothing, accessories and home decor for men, women and kids. The space is sleek and elegant. (18 E. 69th St.)

Lladró:
Spanish porcelain maker Lladró’s new boutique is a study in glass and marble with an all-white palette that is both warm and inviting. The store was designed by designer Jaime Hayon, who was hired by the company in 2006 to oversee and give an updated look to new collections. (500 Madison Ave.)

Melissa: The SoHo outpost (and first U.S. location) of Brazil’s much-loved footwear brand is a sleek, all-white space designed to feel like an ultra-modern, urban cave. The company’s signature plastic shoes (made from recyclable PVC in dozens of colorful shades) are displayed on gallery-like pedestals. (102 Greene St.)

Nike Running: Dedicated to running, the two-level store carries everything and anything needed to pound the pavement. It combines eco-friendly decor with high-tech services, including gait analysis at a digital service station. (156 Fifth Ave.)

Owen: Making its retail debut, Owen offers a carefully edited assortment of up-and-coming brands for stylish men and women. The central element of this 1,800-sq.-ft. Meatpacking District space is a continuous surface made of 25,000 stacked paper bags that arches from floor to ceiling. The honeycomb-like structure makes a dramatic contrast with the existing industrial brick-and-concrete shell. (809 Washington St.)

Piperlime: Gap Inc.’s online retailer goes physical with its first brick-and-mortar location. The 4,000-sq.-ft. store has a clean, modern feel, and offers a curated selection of apparel and accessories. In-store kiosks link directly to Piperlime.com, giving shoppers access to additional product. Orders placed in-store receive free overnight shipping. (121 Wooster St.)

Rookie USA: A new kids-only sports store, Rookie USA is outfitted with an array of fun, high-tech gadgets. Kids can shoot hoops at a virtual basketball court, use interactive touch screens and get basketball tips from a life-sized “virtual” image of New York Knicks player Carmelo Anthony. (808 Columbus Ave.)

Superdry: This two-level, 14,000-sq.-ft. space — the British fast-fashion retailer’s largest U.S. store to date — has a hip, eclectic environment that includes oversized jam jar chandeliers and triple patchwork tables made from reclaimed wood. (729 Seventh Ave.)

Super Trash: The trendy Dutch women’s apparel brand makes its U.S. debut in a loft-like 2,300-sq.-ft. space, complete with a whitewashed brick wall, white sofas and gold-accented white fixtures. (29 Spring St.)

Ted Baker: The quirky British brand’s three-level, 7,000-sq.-ft. flagship is designed to replicate a 1920s-era London townhouse. The men’s wear area recalls a scullery, with rows of butler’s bells on the walls, and pots and pans at the bottom of display racks. (595 Fifth Ave.)

Tommy Bahama: The island-inspired brand’s first store in the Big Apple, it’s also its biggest location so far, with 5,000 sq. ft. of retail and a 1,300-sq.-ft. bar on the first floor, and 6,700-sq.-ft. restaurant on the second. The design emulates the light, airy and relaxed feel of the brand. Paying homage to the city, the facade features louvered screens created from reclaimed wood from New York’s famed Coney Island boardwalk. Don’t miss the 14-ft. fallen elm tree that’s been repurposed as a display fixture. (551 Fifth Ave.)


Click here to see photos of many of the stores listed above.

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duyentran607 says:
Apr-20-2013 11:07 pm

Burton's renovated SoHo flagship is a showcase for the brand's homey New England image. Featured elements include a vintage chairlift, a wood cabin made from reclaimed timbers and a snowboard fabrication press. chat random

P.Lopez says:
Apr-09-2013 05:56 pm

The store was designed by designer Jaime Hayon, who was hired by the company in 2006 to oversee and give an updated look to new collections. chatrandom

P.Lopez says:
Apr-09-2013 05:56 pm

The store was designed by designer Jaime Hayon, who was hired by the company in 2006 to oversee and give an updated look to new collections. chatrandom

M.Mirevski says:
Mar-10-2013 03:44 pm

The reduction switch in a super scanner is used to minimize sensitivity interference. What are the accessories required in metal detecting?Among the accessories required for metal detecting are gloves, probe, knife, gator digger, and ground cloth. our site Each of these will be explained below. Well low and behold it was like someone had replenished the ground with coins.

M.Mirevski says:
Mar-10-2013 03:44 pm

The reduction switch in a super scanner is used to minimize sensitivity interference. What are the accessories required in metal detecting?Among the accessories required for metal detecting are gloves, probe, knife, gator digger, and ground cloth. our site Each of these will be explained below. Well low and behold it was like someone had replenished the ground with coins.

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