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Staffing pop-up locations

BY Katherine Boccaccio

With the proliferation of pop-up stores around the country, it only makes sense that companies would begin to evaluate the kinds of staffing needed for these temporary retail environments. After all, personnel well-suited to a permanent store may not be the best fit for a pop-up.

According to Headway Workforce Solutions, a workforce solutions provider based in Raleigh, N.C., it can be challenging to source appropriate candidates for pop-up locations, over traditional stores, mostly because the pop-up generally operates only for a limited duration. In other words, many candidates might not apply, may self-select out of these types of opportunities, or simply apply to more full-time positions, knowing that these jobs are potentially for a limited employment engagement.

Many retailers are not fully prepared to identify, source, attract and properly screen for workers that appreciate and embrace the limited duration nature of a pop-up location. Their recruitment and staffing selection processes are, many times, geared more to longer-term positions for on-going retail locations.

“Additionally, there are times when the mission and brand goal of a pop-up location is different than that of retailer’s regular brand, and, as a result, the particular candidate skills required for the pop-up operations goals do not align with their more traditional candidate profile, experience, skill attributes,” explained J.P. Sakey, president and CEO of Headway Workforce Solutions, and formerly head of Monster.com NA.

There are any number of differences that can affect the recruitment and selection process of candidates and whether or not a retailer is set up to recruit for these differences is something important to consider, Sakey said. These include differences in the merchandising mix at the pop-up versus the regular store, as well as changes in product and operational requirements as compared to the regular store configuration. Differences in proficiency for product demonstrations for the pop-up compared to the store locations also needs to be factored into the equation.

Following are some areas in which pop-up staffing differs from traditional staffing.

  • With a pop-up, you’re usually hiring to a firm/critical deadline or location opening date, as opposed to ongoing staffing/recruiting needs at a permanent retail location.
  • With a pop-up, a retailer needs a database of established candidates who present flexible, part-time, project-based retail-based work experience, skills and availability.
  • Because of the quick timing of pop-ups, a retailer needs to have online electronic on-boarding (I-9’s, New hire documentation/forms) processes and systems in place. “Being able to quickly, efficiently and seamlessly on-board pop-up workers is a critical piece to the puzzle for these types of workers,” said Sakey.

Having a proven and tested recruitment program for pop-up candidates is essential for being able to find, target, attract, recruit, screen and hire this type of worker, according to Sakey.

“In a pop-up environment, many retailers are not set up on the human-resource side of their business to handle the hiring process,” said Sakey. “The talent on the sales floor for these initiatives, in many ways, is the last key link in the supply chain, and totally impacts a retailer’s service delivery, customer engagement and sales results.”

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Three Technology Trends Your Company Can’t Ignore

BY CSA STAFF

By Daniel Burrus, burrus.com

Technology is evolving … fast. For that reason, it’s imperative that your company be focusing not just on the changes that are happening today, but also on the technological trends that are emerging and shaping the future of your organization and your industry. Why? Because the more anticipatory you can be in regard to technology, the more creatively you can use it to gain competitive advantage.

As someone who has been accurately predicting the future of technology for over 25 years, I urge all leaders to focus on the following three trends that are emerging and reshaping the business landscape as we know it.

1. Just-in-time training
Thanks to cloud-based technology, we’re on the brink of a revolution in just-in-time training. This will enable people to use their laptops, cell phones, and tablet computers as a tool to receive training precisely when they need it. In the current training model used by many organizations, people receive training for a variety of things before they actually need the expertise, thus taking the people away from their jobs and costing the company a lot of money. With just-in-time training, companies can keep people in the field without the specific training.

Then, when the person needs a certain skill set to complete a job or do a task, he or she can receive the training for it in real time via cloud-based technology.

For example, suppose your company specializes in selling and repairing commercial HVAC units. There a number of different units your repair staff needs to know how to fix. But rather than taking your people out of work and putting them in a multi-day training course, you keep them in the field without the specific training. When they have to repair a unit they are not familiar with, they can receive the training on how to fix it in real time via their mobile device as they are servicing the unit.

Now, let’s take this trend a step further. Suppose the commercial HVAC repairperson is onsite, servicing something he’s never worked on before. He uses the just-in-time training module via his tablet computer. But he’s still confused about a certain aspect of the repair. All he has to do is touch the “help” icon on his screen and it immediately connects him to a master trainer live on the screen. But instead of just telling the master trainer what the problem is, the repairperson can put on a headband that has a camera on the front, much like the headbands with a light on the front that people use for camping or car repair. By wearing this digital, high-resolution camera that interfaces with the mobile device, the repairperson can show the master trainer exactly what the issue is. Now that master trainer can see what the repairperson sees and can tell him exactly what to do. The master trainer can lead the repairperson through the repair as if he were standing right there with the repairperson. Talk about a dramatic savings and increase in efficiency!

Realize that using cloud-based technology for just-in-time services goes way beyond repair. It could be used to train people on new software, train salespeople on product upgrades, instruct employees on new policies and procedures, etc. And it’s different and better than a standard tutorial, because the training can be accessed via any device, anywhere, and at anytime…and it offers an option for live help. In reality, the applications for cloud-based, just-in-time services are virtually limitless.

2. Processing power on demand
The increased bandwidth that our mobile devices now receive enables us to connect to the cloud-based technologies easier and faster than ever before. And one thing we know about bandwidth is that it will continue to increase. Because of this, we’ll soon be able to take advantage of another trend that I call processing power on demand — or virtualized processing power.

We have already virtualized so many things. We have virtualized storage where we can store our data on a cloud-based network. Many companies choose this option for data safety and ease of backup, as well as for the ability to access the data via any device. We have virtualized our desktops so that we can see our desktop on anyone else’s machine, just the way it’s supposed to look.

It only makes sense, then, that processing power will be virtualized too. In other words, a mobile device only has a certain amount of processing power. But if you can tap into additional processing power via cloud-based technology, you can turn your mobile device into a super computer where you can do advanced simulations and crunch different data streams together to get real time analytics. Now your handheld device is as powerful and advanced as your desktop. Imagine the increase in productivity if each of your company’s employees had the capability to do complex work that required advanced processing power while they were on the road, armed with nothing more than their mobile device. What would that shift do to your company’s bottom line?

3. Creative application of technology
For both of these trends and others to fully emerge, business leaders have to consider what their people would do with the technology. It’s no longer enough to just deploy technology; you also have to consider how your people can creatively apply the technology in order to gain competitive advantage.

Therefore, you need to go to your internal customers (all the people using the technology in the enterprise) and ask what they want technologically. Give them what they ask for, but realize that they will under-ask because they don’t know what’s technically possible. So while you want to listen to what people in the organization are asking for and give it to them, realize that what they’re not asking for is the bigger and better capabilities—the things they don’t even know are possible.

The key is to go to the next level and give people the ability to do what they currently can’t do, but would want to do, if they only knew they could. After all, people really didn’t ask for an iPhone or a Blackberry. The hidden need was the ability to access their email and internet without being tied to their desktop or laptop.

This is about putting existing technologies together and using them in a creative way. For example, there are literally thousands of features in Microsoft Word that you can select. Most people are using only seven to ten features. And your competitors are using the same features, which means you’re not getting any true competitive advantage. So you need to ask, “What features would be great for our sales group [or HR, or accounting department, or logistics people, etc.] to use — features that are so buried in the software that no one knows they exist?” Most IT departments won’t ask those questions because they’re too busy making sure everything is connected, working well, and safe. And if they’re not asking, who is? Who in your organization is looking at the tools you already have and asking if they are being underused? Chances are the answer is “no one.” As such, it’s safe to say that all your tools are underutilized.

Therefore, you need to implement a communication vehicle that engages the different groups you serve in the enterprise—such as sales, logistics, purchasing, accounting, human resources, etc. — and you need to engage them in helping them understand the power of the tools they have access to. One suggestion is to automatically show them a “feature of the day” and how it can make their life easier. This is about giving them information in short, fun, engaging ways rather than a hundred-page document detailing all the features (which no one will read anyway). Some software programs have such features where you get a tip per day. Perhaps you can customize that idea and apply it internally so that the different groups get information tailored specifically to them and their needs.

Create your company’s future
Many business leaders will say they are too busy to address any of these trends. But if you don’t address them, who will? Ultimately, whoever drives these trends within an organization will be perceived as a significant contributor to the enterprise — someone worth keeping … and someone with high value in the marketplace. When that someone is you, you can drive results to the bottom line and be a key contributor to the organization’s success.

Daniel Burrus is the founder and CEO of Burrus Research, a research and consulting firm that monitors global advancements in technology-driven trends to help clients better understand how technological, social and business forces are converging to create enormous, untapped opportunities. He is the author of six books, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal best seller "Flash Foresight: How To See the Invisible and Do the Impossible as well as Technotrends." For more information, please visit: www.burrus.com.

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Report: FSI coupon activity down in 2011

BY CSA STAFF

MINNEAPOLIS — Free Standing Insert coupon activity dropped 3.9% over the first six months of 2011 versus the same time period a year ago, Marx, a Kantar Media solution, reported on Wednesday.

The decline is the first reported in the first half of the year since 2008, when there was a 3.4% decline.

“After several years of significant growth, FSI coupon activity may be stabilizing while more integrated print and digital coupon promotion tactics are emerging,” stated Mark Nesbitt, president of Kantar Media Intelligence North America.

“For example, some CPG brands are using their FSI events to drive shoppers to their brand websites or social media websites to download coupons,” Nesbitt added. “Additionally, some CPG manufacturers are distributing digital coupons on retailer websites to support their major corporate scale themed FSI coupon events.”

The number of coupons dropped through FSIs may be down, but the value of those coupons isn’t. During the first half of 2011, more than $236 billion in consumer incentives were delivered via FSI coupons in Sunday newspapers, up 0.8% from the same period in 2010. During the same six-month period, more than 149 billion coupons were distributed within more than 111 billion FSI pages. FSI coupon average face value achieved a new record level in the first half of 2011 at $1.58, up 4.9%, Kantar Media reported.

And retail promotion activity is on the rise, however, Kantar Media reported. The number of pages increased to 8.4 billion, representing a 27.3% increase. Walmart jumped from being ranked No. 13 based on pages circulated during the first half of 2010 to lead retailer promotion activity for the first half of 2011. Seven-of-the-top-10 retailers increased pages circulated during the first half of 2011 versus one year ago. Additionally, the number of manufacturers participating in retailer promotion events increased from 211 during the first half of 2010, to 293 during the first half of 2011.

Retailers from mass (Walmart, Target); value (Dollar General, Family Dollar); drug (Walgreens, CVS Caremark); and specialty pet (Petsmart, Petco) comprised the top eight positions. Kroger and Publix were the leading food retailers and were ranked No. 9 and No. 10, respectively.

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