ENERGY/HVAC

Store design competition finalists revealed

BY Marianne Wilson

The Retail Design Institute has revealed the finalists for its 45th Annual International Store Design Awards Program.

All the awards, including the highly anticipated Store of the Year Award, will be revealed, and bestowed on the honorees, at the Institute’s annual Awards Gala on March 12, 2016, at the Hilton Anatole, Dallas. For more information and to buy tickets, click here.

Here are the finalists (in alphabetical order):

• Abenson, Manila
Design: rkd Retail/iQ

• Beauty Brands, Kansas City
Design: Kiku Obata & Company

• Caudalie, Washington, DC
Design: TPG Architecture

• Charming Charlie, New York City
Design: CallisonRTKL

• David Jones,Sydney, Australia,
Design: Dalziel & Pow

• de Boulle Diamond & Jewelry, Houston
Design: Gensler

• Desjardins Marche Central, Montreal
Design: Ædifica

•eatsa, San Francisco
Design: eatsa

• El Puente Pharmacy, Granada, Spain
Design: ariasrecalde taller de arquitectura

•The Frye Company, Atlanta
Design: The Frye Company

• Hudson’s Bay, Richmond Hill, Ontario Canada
Design: Hudson Bay Store Planning & Design

• Hudson’s Bay (footwear, Queen Street), Toronto
Design: Hudson Bay Store Planning & Design

• JINS, San Francisco
Design: Kwan Henmi Architecture & Planning

• Kabuki Sushi Lounge, Toronto
Design: dialogue 38

• kikki.K, London
Design: Dalziel & Pow

• LCBO, Toronto
Design: II By IV Design

• Leroy Merlin, Le Havre, France
Design: Dalziel & Pow

• Neo Coffee Bar, Toronto
Design: dialogue 38

• Nordstrom, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Design: Nordstrom Store Design
CallisonRTKL and James K.M. Cheng Architects

• Olympia Tile and Stone, North York, Ontario, Canada
Design: II By IV Design

• I+ Pharmacy, Sevilla, Spain
Design: Marketing-Jazz

• PNC GingerBranch, Pittsburgh
Design: Design Compendium

• Ponto Frio Premium, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Design: GH Consultoria de Varejo LTDA

• Primark, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania
Design: Gensler

• Primo, Tangerang, Indonesia
Design: rkd Retail/iQ

• Quiznos Grill, Denver
Design: Tesser

• Raymond RTW, Bangalore, India
Design: Gensler

• Reggie’s Bar,Montreal
Design: Ædifica

• Sterns & Foster Showroom, Las Vegas
Design: dash design

• Studio Xfinity, Chicago
Design: ESI Design

• The Inutilious Retailer, New York City
Design: Adrian Wilson

• Whole Foods Market, Playa Vista, Calif.
Design: DL English Design

• WithMe Chicago, Chicago
Design: Giorgio Borruso Design

Click here for ticket information (a portion of each ticket benefits the Student Design Competition Prize Fund).

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MOBILITY

Study: How do you make seamless shopping a reality?

BY Dan Berthiaume

Retailers who are looking to provide a genuine omnichannel customer experience can take one crucial step to help themselves.

According to a new study of more than 300 global retail CEOs, including 100 U.S. CEOs, from enterprise retail technology provider JDA Software Group Inc. and PwC, operational silos are a key inhibitor to delivering an integrated, seamless experience. Only 18% of CEOs said they have eliminated operational silos and are delivering seamless omnichannel shopping experiences for their customers.

Companies without operational silos expressed greater confidence in revenue growth (59% compared to 48% average for all CEOs) and profit growth (63% compared to 43%) than their peers. The study also indicates CEOs that have removed silos are also achieving competitive advantage though lower costs and increased investments in customer-centric services.

Seventy-four percent of CEOs in companies operating in silos say their costs for omnichannel fulfillment are increasing, while only 59% of the companies that have eliminated silos say these costs are increasing.

The highest costs for omnichannel fulfillment center around shipping to consumers. Thirty-two percent of CEOs who have eliminated silos and 45% of those with silos indicate shipping directly to consumers from a distribution center is their highest omnichannel fulfillment cost. Meanwhile, 51% of respondents without silos and 67% with silos cited processing returns as their highest omnichannel fulfillment cost.

Non-siloed omnichannel companies are also more likely to offer in-store click & collect (56%) than their peers with silos (47%), but are less likely to offer any of the other click & collect options such as picking up purchases at lockers or commuter travel hubs. Non-siloed companies appear more focused on the speed of delivery, favoring same-day over next-day deliveries and are more likely to offer specific time slots for customer deliveries.

On average, respondents are spending 26% of their investment capital on omnichannel readiness in 2016, with some of these investments centering around extending omnichannel fulfillment options for customers (51%), providing a seamless customer shopping experience (49%) and understanding social media for business use (49%).

To deal with the high costs of omnichannel fulfillment, CEOs are planning to offset increased costs in the following ways:

• Raising the minimum order value for free home delivery (39%).
• Raising the minimum order value for free click & collect services (31%).
• Increasing the cost for home delivery (29%).

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News

Perry Ellis stays consistent with store tech

BY Dan Berthiaume

Specialty vertical apparel retailer Perry Ellis International is solidifying its enterprise approach to the systems that support store processes.

Perry Ellis teamed with retail system integration and development services provider BTM Global to implement Oracle Retail Point-of-Service (ORPOS) v14 and Oracle Retail Store Inventory Management (SIM) v14 for its stores throughout the U.S.

As part of a larger Oracle Retail v14 enterprise project, BTM Global upgraded ORPOS v14 and SIM v14 from v12 rather than perform a new implementation. As a result, the entire project and rollout was completed in less than nine months, meeting the deadlines for the holiday season. Perry Ellis is now able to provide secure payment via tokenization, enhance customer interaction at the register with integration to the VeriFone MX925 payment device, and accept new payment formats such as Apple Pay.

In addition, BTM Global implemented the Oracle Merchandising and Store Suite of products, including solutions for merchandising, monitoring, allocation, central and back office, as well as an integration bus.

“We chose BTM Global because of its unique and value-driven approach,” said Filiz Yavuz, senior vice president of business process engineering at Perry Ellis International. “They are a trusted partner because they are strategic thinkers who had PEI’s best interests in mind. With ORPOS v14 and SIM v14, we now have better flexibility and responsiveness that improve customer service and efficiency.”

An enterprise approach like Perry Ellis’s store systems strategy offers several advantages. Implementation is quicker and generally less costly, as retailers avoid a lot of potential customization and integration and can also negotiate better contract terms with a single provider delivering.

Choosing to upgrade existing POS and inventory management system also saved significant time and expense. Enterprise architecture is not always the best choice for every retail technology implementation project, but early results indicate Perry Ellis made the correct decision.

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