OPERATIONS

Study: Millennials opt for Walmart over Amazon

BY Katherine Boccaccio

Kansas City — A new study of the millennial generation shows that many 25- to 34-year-old shoppers change their purchasing habits and behaviors after they start their families.

According to the “Millennials as New Parents” study, fielded by Vision Critical and conducted and analyzed by Barkley, when given the choice to shop at one store for the rest of their lives, millennial parents chose Walmart over Amazon.com and Target. The group also chose brick-and-mortar Walmart and Target locations as their shopping destinations of choice, over online stalwart amazon.com.

When broken down by income level, the answer shifts slightly. High-income millennial parents chose Target, while middle and low income brackets chose Walmart.

Before they become parents, millennials rank their favorite brands in order of descending importance as Nike, Sony and Gap, with 10% naming Nike as their top choice. After they become parents, millennials continue to name Nike as their top affinity brand, but at a much lower margin. Only 6% put Nike at the top — followed by Target and Apple at 3% each.

Millennial parents are pragmatic — when compared to before they had children, they buy significantly more based on price than they do on quality. Before they were parents, their buying decisions were 57% on quality. After parenthood, they buy just over 50% on quality.

In some categories — dining and entertainment, apparel, and digital products — the change is more dramatic, with the shift away from quality and toward price dropping as much as 20%.

Millennials, the most transparent generation ever, continue to remain heavily connected online even after they become parents. Over 35% of millennial parents claim to have posted on Facebook in the last day.

Millennials as a whole regularly trade private information for perks from brands they favor. However, that willingness falters a bit when millennials become parents, with 48% claiming they are less likely to give up private information about themselves in exchange for promotional perks.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
OPERATIONS

CVS reveals via Facebook it won’t sell Boston Bomber edition of Rolling Stone

BY Katherine Boccaccio

New YorkForbes reported that CVS has opted not to sell the latest edition of Rolling Stone magazine, which features a photo of “Boston Bomber” Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on its cover.

CVS issued the following statement on Facebook: “CVS/pharmacy has decided not to sell the current issue of Rolling Stone featuring a cover photo of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect. As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones.”

The Facebook post has been ‘liked’ 32,000 times and shared more than 13,000.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
OPERATIONS

Books-A-Million to install Espresso Book Machines in-store

BY Katherine Boccaccio

Birmingham, Ala. — Books-A-Million has teamed with On Demand Books to put Espresso Book Machines in BAM’s Portland, Maine, store; a second store is slated for installation at a later date.

The Espresso Book Machine is a digital-to-print retail solution that produces a bookstore-quality paperback with color cover, in any standard trim size, at point of sale. The content is fed to the machine via EspressNet, On Demand Books’ growing digital network of titles. These titles are available through partnerships with Google, Lightning Source, Harper Collins, Hachette, Penguin, Macmillan, McGraw Hill, and others, and include content from publishers like Random House, W.W. Norton, and Simon & Schuster.

Like iTunes for books, EspressNet retrieves, encrypts, transmits, and catalogs books from a multitude of English and foreign language content providers (including public domain, in copyright, and self-published). Through the SelfEspress software, writers can format, design, edit, and upload their book for printing and inclusion on the EBM catalog, as well as convert the print file to an .epub format suitable for e-readers. Xerox manages the worldwide service for the Espresso Book Machines.

“This offering means something special for BAM customers, who will now have access to a virtual inventory of seven million titles instantly available to them,” said Terrance G. Finley, CEO of Books-A-Million.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...