REAL ESTATE

Survey: Real estate investment less impacted by climate change in downturn

BY CSA STAFF

Washington, D.C. A report released Monday by the Urban Land Institute has found that the ongoing downturn in the commercial real estate industry has temporarily lessened the importance of climate change and alternative energy sources as a factor in real estate investment decisions.

Interest, however, is expected to pick up when the market rallies, the survey of U.S. financial industry leaders also found.

ULI’s survey, conducted through ULI The Americas in May, drew responses from more than 200 executives of some of the leading financial institutions in the United States, including investment funds, institutional investors, real estate investment trusts and banks, as well as individual investors.

“For now, the global downturn has trumped emerging attempts to realize benefits from green development,” the report stated. “For investors, thinking green today refers to dollars. Environmental issues play a factor only when they produce an immediate return or mitigate an investment risk.”

The report noted that the federal government’s emphasis on greening America, reflected in the economic stimulus funds aimed at reducing the carbon footprint of both new and existing buildings, “hasn’t prompted many (investors) to leap on the bandwagon … They are waiting to see how they’ll be hit by regulation yet to come, on the federal, state and local levels.”

Still, while interest rates and job growth dominated investment concerns among the survey respondents, the majority said that issues related to climate change will be increasingly important in the years ahead. In the interim, “many are doing what they can on a few fronts, such as conducting energy-efficiency analyses and increasing their internal expertise … What investors do today, and what they anticipate having to do in the future are two separate matters,” the report said.

In summary, the survey found that 40% of respondents felt the economic downturn had somewhat weakened the business significance of climate change and energy issues; an additional 17% said it had significantly weakened the significance of those issues.

Nearly 80% said they have not yet altered their business models or approach to deal structures due to climate change and energy issues. Nearly half said climate change and energy issues would be at least somewhat important over both the next year and the next five years. About 15% rated climate change and energy issues as important over the next year; over the next five years, about 26%.

Nearly 50% said their companies have developed significant expertise in energy or energy-efficiency issues, and one-third have developed professional expertise in sustainable community development.

Eighty percent said their due diligence reviews include explicit energy-efficiency analyses, and nearly that many include transit accessibility and location efficiency in the reviews. Conversely, only about 10% factor in carbon footprints.

The fact that most respondents are waiting on the outcome of legislative and regulatory activity illustrates the paralyzing effect of unknowns in the real estate investment sector, pointed out ULI chairman Jeremy Newsum, executive trustee of The Grosvenor Estate, based in the United Kingdom.

“In the United States, with so much still unknown about the impact of government policies related to climate change, the cautious approach by the lending community is to be expected,” Newsum said. “However, the fact that investment decisions are not currently based on climate change does not mean that this will continue to be the case in the years ahead.  The pause necessitated by the downturn is offering an opportunity for real estate investors and developers to get smarter about what they need to do in an industry in which being green will mean being competitive.”

The report was supported by Cherokee, a national real estate investment firm based in Raleigh, N.C., and Akerman Senterfitt, a national law firm headquartered in Miami.  

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
News

Best Buy wants to see your ‘scariest’ technology

BY CSA STAFF

MINNEAPOLIS Best Buy has launched a new Web site, inviting customers to submit photos of their “scariest” old technology for the chance to win a number of prizes.

Through Oct. 26, visitors to the Web site www.ScaryTechnology.com are encouraged to enter photos of their “scary” technology, from a VCR thats eat tapes to a screeching dial-up modem, along with a caption to bring the photo to life.

 

One grand prize winner will receive a home theater makeover from Insignia and Rocketfish, with complete Geek Squad installation (a total value up to $3,500). In addition one first runner up will receive a $1,500 Best Buy gift card, and one second runner up will receive a $1,000 Best Buy gift card.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
News

Destination Maternity re-launches Two Hearts line at Sears, Kmart

BY CSA STAFF

PHILADELPHIA Destination Maternity annonced that it is re-launching its Two Hearts Maternity by Destination Maternity collection exclusively at Sears and Kmart stores. The rollout of the Two Hearts collection began in early October and will reach approximately 523 Sears locations and approximately 100 Kmart locations by the end of the month.

The Two Hearts Maternity collection features dresses, swimwear, lingerie and sleepwear. Most items are priced under $25, according to the company.

 

The Two Hearts Maternity collection was previously offered in Sears stores from April 2004 through June 2008. The re-birth of the line, renamed to include the Destination Maternity byline, represents an opportunity to offer great fashion and value to Sears and Kmart Moms-to-be.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...