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Target’s Missoni ‘Mayhem’

BY Marianne Wilson

The fashion blogosphere have been overrun with complaints about how Target botched the launch of its latest and exclusive limited-time collection, Missoni for Target. And shoppers across the nation have taken to Facebook, Twitter and other sites to share their frustrations. The folks who seem to be the most put-out are those that ordered goods online. After experiencing long delays and going through any number of hurdles before they were even able to place an order, many are now being told that their orders will be delayed or, even worse, cancelled.

Target hasn’t said much beyond that it seriously underestimated demand for the Missoni collection. (I have to admit, I was taken aback by all the frenzy surrounding the Missoni-branded goods. When did the venerable Missoni house become hot?) But the fact is the retailer hyped the collection big time, with a brilliant marketing campaign that capitalized on social media and also included an attention-getting pop-up in Manhattan and a perfectly timed debut (Fashion Week).

In many ways, Target was the victim of its own success. The Missoni campaign — and the demand it helped generate — reflected the prowess of the chain’s marketing engine. But its marketing success came with a price, from empty store shelves to disgruntled online shoppers to the grumblings of industry techies who question whether the retailer’s revamped website is up to meeting heavy consumer demand.

Target hasn’t said much about its plans going forward for the Missoni collection, which was scheduled to run until Oct. 22. A check of my local Target (in suburban New Jersey) on the Saturday after the launch turned up nothing except a couple of shower curtains and a few other miscellaneous items. When I asked an associate if the goods would be restocked, she replied “We hope so, but we really don’t know.”

I disagree with those who say that the Missoni fiasco will put a dent in Target’s brand image long term. In fact, I don’t think it will even turn off many consumers in the short term. Shoppers, especially the fashionista types that this collection attracted, have short memories. Style usually wins out — even over poor service. And yes, there are important supply chain and technology lessons to be learned here. But there is also a more basic lesson: When you have the right product at the right price, shoppers will open their wallets — even in an uncertain economy.

PS: For an interesting take on Missoni for Target from a supply chain perspective, click here.

Click here for past As I See It entries.

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P.Lopez says:
Apr-10-2013 07:03 pm

Chatrandom
The folks who seem to be the most put-out are those that ordered goods online. After experiencing long delays and going through any number of hurdles before they were even able to place an order. Chatrandom

P.Lopez says:
Apr-10-2013 07:03 pm

The folks who seem to be the most put-out are those that ordered goods online. After experiencing long delays and going through any number of hurdles before they were even able to place an order. Chatrandom

N.Eschete says:
Mar-28-2012 05:06 am

So-called limited
So-called limited partnerships, in which high-end designers create cheaper versions of their fashions for lower-end stores, have become popular in recent years because they appeal to cost-conscious customers who want to be stylish but aren't willing to pay designer prices. At a time when Americans are watching every dollar they spend, the limited-time offerings also are part of a growing strategy by retailers to spur impulse buys by creating a sense of urgency for shoppers to buy. Swedish retailer H&M, which caters to 20- and 30-somethings with trendy clothes, often attracts long lines at its stores that reach around the block when it offers limited-run affordable fashions from upscale designers like Jimmy Choo. It also will be launching a less expensive version of the Italian designer Versace's collection in November.

N.Eschete says:
Mar-28-2012 05:06 am

So-called limited partnerships, in which high-end designers create cheaper versions of their fashions for lower-end stores, have become popular in recent years because they appeal to cost-conscious customers who want to be stylish but aren't willing to pay designer prices. At a time when Americans are watching every dollar they spend, the limited-time offerings also are part of a growing strategy by retailers to spur impulse buys by creating a sense of urgency for shoppers to buy. Swedish retailer H&M, which caters to 20- and 30-somethings with trendy clothes, often attracts long lines at its stores that reach around the block when it offers limited-run affordable fashions from upscale designers like Jimmy Choo. It also will be launching a less expensive version of the Italian designer Versace's collection in November.

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Whirlpool named to Dow Jones Sustainability Index

BY CSA STAFF

BENTON HARBOR, Mich. — Whirlpool announced it has been named to the 2011/2012 Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI) for the seventh consecutive year. In 2011, the company’s centennial year, Whirlpool was named to both the World and North America lists. The DJSI tracks the financial performance of the leading sustainability-driven companies worldwide.

"It is an honor to be recognized by one of the world’s most comprehensive reviews of sustainable business practices for the seventh consecutive year," said Jeff M. Fettig, chairman and CEO of Whirlpool. "Our goal has always been to provide innovative solutions to every customer while remaining committed to social responsibility. Through the combined power of our global enterprise and outstanding employee commitment, our vision has become a reality."

Launched in 1999, the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes are the first global indexes tracking the financial performance of the leading sustainability-driven companies worldwide. Based on the cooperation of Dow Jones Indexes, STOXX Limited and SAM they are intended to provide asset managers with reliable and objective benchmarks to manage sustainability portfolios.

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Kroger recognized for spending with Hispanic suppliers

BY CSA STAFF

CINCINNATI — Kroger announced that it has become a member of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Million Dollar Club.

According to Kroger, membership into the USHCC Million Dollar Club, is awarded to corporations who have spentbetween $25 million to over $500 million with Hispanic suppliers, in the previous year.

This is Kroger’s second consecutive year of qualifying for membership. The company was inducted in the $250 to $500 million annual expenditure category.

"The success of our business is linked to our efforts to encourage diversity throughout Kroger," said Reuben Shaffer, Kroger’s chief diversity officer. "We are honored to receive this recognition and value our membership in the U.S. Hispanic Chamber’s Million Dollar Club, which reflects our ongoing commitment to supplier diversity. We look forward to continuing our strong partnerships with Hispanic-owned businesses and their help carrying out our customer first strategy."

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