News

Three Lessons Digital Retailers Can Learn From Fishing

BY Dan Berthiaume

Now that the dog days of summer are here, it’s a perfect time to go fishing. While fishing may be the opposite of work (at least if done properly), there are still valuable lessons digital retailers can take from the ocean, lake or stream back to the office. Here are a few fishing-related digital retail tips even non-anglers can follow.

Finding Structure

Fresh water fishing aficionados know that fish swimming in lakes and ponds like structure, or changes in contour and depth along the bottom of the body of water. Structure can include man-made features like the remains of a boat, as well as natural changes in the surface. Knowing where the structure is can make a huge difference in the success of a fishing expedition.

Likewise, digital retailers need to be aware of online “structure” that attracts consumers who are likely to buy their products. This includes blogs, social media pages, video channels, online communities, coupon and deal sites, digital shopping and auction platforms, and popular RSS feeds. By carefully using structure to help target high-value consumers with relevant messages, offers and information, digital retailers can land new customers instead of mourning the ones who got away.

Tracking Customers

Even the hardiest of old salts realizes that highly sophisticated, GPS-enabled fish finding technology makes locating elusive marine quarry much easier. While fish finding systems do not negate the value of human instinct and expertise that can only be honed by years on the water, they complement gut feeling nicely and also allow even non-expert anglers to increase their catches.

Digital retailers can similarly buttress the know-how of in-house merchandising and marketing experts with the use of advanced IT solutions that track the behavior, purchase habits and even location of shoppers in near-real or real time. Thus retailers can make much more precisely targeted offers via text, email, automated coupon, or other digitally enhanced means at the moment when customers are most likely to take advantage of them. And the user-friendly interfaces of most modern IT applications means that the functionality to deliver highly personalized and timely offers can be distributed to store associates and customer service representatives as well as to senior marketing and technology personnel.

Baiting Offers

Simply throw a worm on a hook, toss your line in the water, and get ready for… a lot of waiting and watching. Different fish require different bait, which may be live or manmade and vary by a dizzying array of other crucial features. In addition, how you cast, the type of rod and line you use, and numerous other factors are critical to successfully catching the type of fish you are after.

Digital retailers also need to realize that different types of omnichannel “bait” work best for different types of customers. Tech-savvy, rushed Millennials may react well to location-based, time-sensitive texts, while slower-paced Boomers may prefer an email notifying them of a personalized deal well in advance. Women may like participating in cooperative social games while men may want online recognition on a leaderboard for competitive achievements. Just remember that even knowing where your digital customers congregate and what they’re doing at a given moment won’t produce results if you don’t know who they are and what they want.


More Tech Bytes

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
News

RuMe adds former Groupon exec to board

BY CSA STAFF

RuMe, an earth friendly lifestyle brand, has appointed Farhan Yasin to its board of directors. Yasin joins RuMe’s board to provide strategic guidance on the company’s continued innovation and expansion within e-commerce, business operations and managing its rapid growth.

Yasin is the co-founder and CEO of DataClover, formerly Snehta, a sales and marketing software provider that manages customer acquisitions and retention by delivering relevant connections between businesses and consumers. Prior to founding DataClover, Yasin served as the chief operating officer of Groupon, focusing on international growth and sales strategies. Prior to his tenure at Groupon, he served as the president of CareerBuilder’s EMEA group, directing its international strategy.

"Farhan is a world-class operating executive and we look forward to leveraging his expertise to further develop our lifestyle brand," said Jae Lee, RuMe’s CEO. "Like RuMe, Farhan is focused on innovation and operations and we anticipate his insights to be exceptionally valuable for our e-commerce efforts and managing RuMe’s growth."

"RuMe already has an impressive line-up of products that are highly functional, aesthetically pleasing and sustainable," said Yasin. "I am excited to be involved with an innovative organization that is on the cutting edge of the reusable products industry, to help navigate and further spur its growth."

Denver, Co. based RuMe, short for ReUseMe, launched on Earth Day 2008 by a husband and wife team, Jae and Katy Lee, with a mission of making eco-consciousness easy. RuMe’s diverse portfolio of products offers sustainable solutions for a broad range of users.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
OPERATIONS

Schnuck class-action notification underway

BY Katherine Boccaccio

St. Louis — A settlement in a Schnuck Markets, Inc., security breach class-action lawsuit has been reached and a notification program is underway, as approved by the Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis, State of Missouri.

Customers of 79 Schnuck grocery stores are being alerted that the breach, which occurred between December 9, 2012 and March 30, 2013, has been settled and that they may be entitled to a share of the proceeds.

On March 30, 2013, Schnucks announced that its computer systems had been compromised; the incident involved the insertion of malicious computer code that targeted data in the magnetic stripe of credit and debit cards swiped at 79 Schnucks stores.

The lawsuit claims that Schnucks was responsible for the security incident because Schnucks did not take appropriate care to protect its payment card systems from hacking. Schnucks denies all of the claims and says it did not do anything wrong.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

Polls

Consumer confidence is high. Is that reflected in your stores’ revenues?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...