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Trends in Building Envelopes

BY CSA STAFF

Retail facades and storefronts have come under increased scrutiny in recent years for the important role they play in brand identity. Chain Store Age talked with Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope’s Kent Baumann about trends in building envelope solutions and how the industry is evolving.

Retail facades and storefronts have come under increased scrutiny in recent years for the important role they play in brand identity. Chain Store Age talked with Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope’s Kent Baumann about trends in building envelope solutions and how the industry is evolving.

What are some of the key trends in building envelope solutions with regard to retail stores?

One of the biggest trends is that retailers now see the building as part of their overall branding. They view the storefront and curtain wall as giving customers the first touch to the inside of the store. That means more importance is being given to having the building envelope meet brand intent by using colors, textures and design elements that help customers identify the brand. This has, in turn, given rise to another trend, which is the greater use of custom materials.

How has the process of designing and engineering the building envelope changed or evolved in recent years?

It’s become much more complex. During the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in code development. Code compliance, along with the increased emphasis on sustainability, has resulted in a whole host of factors that need to be considered and factored into the process. You have to do a lot more homework.

There has also been a change in the procurement model, in that more and more retailers are adopting direct procurement and buying their own construction materials. We are finding that as brands get more specialized in what they want their buildings to look like, they want more control in the procurement and delivery of materials. Ten years ago we had no direct sell clients; now we have a dozen.

How is Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope positioned in the marketplace?

We are the leading supplier of products specified to close the building envelope. And all of our components are engineered to work together seamlessly. We design, engineer, test and manufacture curtain wall, windows, storefronts, skylights and glass as one seamlessly integrated unit. This process results in better buildings, a simplified process, less risk and fewer delays.

Also, we have 50 manufacturing locations — the largest national footprint of any manufacturer — and that gives us the unique ability to provide consistent entrance and storefront systems wherever you and your projects are. Also, because we are able to manufacture pre-assembled frames, we can significantly reduce construction times. While we offer a full line of standard doors and entrances, we regularly create custom designs to meet a project’s specific criteria.

Today, our national accounts include boutique small- and large-box retail stores. We provide a premium value to our customers by leveraging our single-source capabilities and individual facility expertise.

What approach does Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope take to the building envelope?

Our approach is consistent with what the American Institute of Architects describes as “Integrated Project Delivery (IPD).” It’s a strategy that integrates people, systems, business structures and practices into a process that collaboratively harnesses the talents and insights of all participants to reduce waste and optimize efficiency of design, fabrication and construction. We believe this approach is the key to the future of our industry.”

What role does sustainability play in your organization?

Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope encourages the use of collaboration and advanced BIM technologies to create smart building envelopes. It is the policy of our company to be environmentally friendly to the communities where our manufacturing facilities are located, as well as the areas in which our products are installed and maintained. We have an active waste minimization plan, and we are continually improving its operations to reduce waste and maximize efficiency.

Do you offer assistance to owners who are obtaining LEED certification?

Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope is committed to creating products that satisfy LEED, and we have outlined various ways our products and services contribute to LEED Project Certification in the following areas: Energy & Atmosphere, Materials & Resources, Indoor Environmental Air Quality and Innovative & Design Process.

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J.Lawrence says:
Apr-24-2013 09:47 am

Envelopes have diverse sizes
Envelopes have diverse sizes and format. There are pouch envelops and a financier envelopes, the size vary depending on the size of the text inside. Envelopes Printing

J.Lawrence says:
Apr-24-2013 09:47 am

Envelopes have diverse sizes and format. There are pouch envelops and a financier envelopes, the size vary depending on the size of the text inside. Envelopes Printing

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SPOTLIGHT ON: Sustainability

BY Marianne Wilson

Solid-state lighting took center stage at the SPECS Sustainability session, “LEDs: Perception and Reality.”

Speaker Leigh Savage, national accounts manager, GE Lighting, debunked many of the myths that surround LED lighting. They included:

• LEDs produce no heat at all. FALSE

• LEDs are more efficient than any other light source. NOT NECESSARILY.

• LEDs are still too expensive to use in retail applications. FALSE

• LEDs look too “blue” for use in retail. FALSE

• And they last forever. FALSE

• All LEDs are basically the same. FALSE

• It is not important for an LED company to be a U.S. DOE (Department of Energy) quality advocate. FALSE

“Being registered as a DOE Quality Advocate ensures that the company you are working with will be held accountable,” Savage said.

Renewable energy: Available options for renewable energy systems were reviewed at the session, “Alternative Energy: What’s on the Horizon?” with Sam Khalilieh, senior VP, architecture and engineering, WD Partners.

Khalilieh also discussed the successful use of fuel cell technology at Stop & Shop’s store in East Torrington, Conn. The project was a collaboration involving Stop & Shop, WD Partners and United Technologies. The fuel cell, a UTC Power PureCell System Model 400, was commissioned in June 2010.

“We’ve maintained about 96% up-time, and have provided over 90% of the store’s total electric energy consumption through the fuel cell,” Khalilieh said. “We could actually provide a greater percentage of the store’s electric energy requirements, but we’ve left the fuel cell in load-following mode, rather than producing a constant 400 kW.”

Khalilieh noted that the world’s energy resources and environment will be under tremendous pressure during the next 20 years when 2 billion people in China, India and the Middle East start their ascend to the middle class.

“By 2035, worldwide electricity demand will be 80% higher than it was in 2010,” he said.

Given that scenario, all avenues with regard to energy use should be explored and collectively put to use where it makes sense, he added.

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SPOTLIGHT ON: Facilities

BY Katherine Boccaccio

Energy efficiency is one of the key benefits of using LED lighting. But there are plenty of other reasons to incorporate LEDs into retail stores, Sally Lee, applications marketing manager for Osram Sylvania, told attendees at the session, “Spotlight on LED: Getting the Dirt on Rare Earth Minerals.”

Small, inherently directional LEDs are a great candidate for highlighting merchandise, Lee said, and their enhanced brilliance and product appearance result in increased sales. She cited a 2007 Costco study, which determined that jewelry appeared to be of higher quality under LED light and resulted in higher sales compared with fluorescent lighting.

In other advantages, the long life of LEDs can reduce maintenance costs and help support store image. Also, most LEDs emit no UV light, which reduces damaging effects on materials and merchandise.

“And the color mixing of LEDs can bring a retail space to life with a dynamic and dazzling array of colors,” Lee said.

Refrigerated displays are one of the top retail applications for LEDs.

“This is a big area because LEDs perform better at cold temperatures,” Lee said, who added that the lower heat of the lamps also lengthens the shelf life of foods.

Signage and illuminated advertising are also well suited to LEDs. Used in these applications, LEDs offer such advantages as consistent brand image, lower maintenance and energy costs, design flexibility and ease of installation.

The use of LEDs in recessed downlights also delivers significant benefits, including the ability to capitalize on the directional light of LEDs to improve system efficacy.

Solid-state lighting is also playing a major role in retrofits, according to Lee. She said that there is not an application in retail today without an LED choice.

That is not to say, however, that LEDs are a silver bullet. LEDs are heat-sensitive and produce less light and fail early if not thermally managed. Also, lamps with the same specifications may have inconsistencies, making it difficult to match one lamp to the next.

“LEDs are still expensive on a first-cost basis compared with traditional choices,” Lee concluded. “But because of all of the advantages — both short- and long-term — I truly believe that it’s the best energy choice you can make.”

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