OPERATIONS

Trina Turk uses Demandware platform for seamless omnichannel shopping

BY Marianne Wilson

Burlington, Mass. — Demandware, a leading provider of enterprise cloud commerce solutions, announced that fashion and lifestyle brand Trina Turk is using the Demandware Commerce platform as the digital foundation for its commerce operations. Trina Turk, which re-launched its ecommerce site earlier this year with the Demandware platform, is leveraging Demandware to provide seamless shopping experiences across web, mobile and other distribution channels.

Trina Turk, founded as a women’s clothing line, has expanded into new product categories, including accessories (footwear and jewelry), activewear, handbags and bedding, as part of its growth strategy. However, Trina Turk was stifled by the limitations of its previous ecommerce platform, which lacked the functionality and scalability to support the company’s brand strategy and rapid growth of its online channel. The brand turned to Demandware’s cloud platform because it provides built-in scalability, robust merchandising functionality and the flexibility to deliver unique brand experiences. The company is also using Demandware’s order management functionality for shipping and order processing.

“As more of our shoppers connect to our brand, it’s no surprise that online is our fastest-growing channel, as well as one of our largest,” said Ray Starck, VP e-commerce, Trina Turk. “It’s critical that we stay true to our brand and deliver an engaging shopping experience, regardless of where our customers digitally shop. Demandware gives us a flexible and powerful platform that lets us continually enhance our brand experience without the burden of worrying about the back-end infrastructure.”

Trina Turk worked with Demandware LINK Solution Partners LiveAreaLabs for site design and Lyons Consulting Group for implementation.

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La-Z-Boy names president of retail segment

BY Marianne Wilson

Monroe, Mich. — La-Z-Boy Inc. announced the promotion of Daniel King to president of the company’s retail Segment. He has served as VP of La-Z-Boy’s retail operations since July of 2011.

In his new role as President, King will be responsible for all facets of the company-owned La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries stores, including sales, store operations, training and merchandising functions. The company owns 101 of the 315 stores and, in fiscal 2014 the segment recorded approximately $300 million in sales.

Before joining La-Z-Boy as director of retail sales and operations, King was divisional VP (Southern Division) of Pepboys, where he had responsibility for 153 stores.

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Ron Johnson: ‘I was a terrible fit for J.C. Penney’

BY Marianne Wilson

New York — Ron Johnson, who has been keeping a relatively low profile since he was ousted from J.C. Penney in April 2013, took to the podium in May, as a guest lecturer at Stanford University. Johnson, a graduate of Stanford and a member of its board, was a guest speaker at the university’s View From the Top series, where he discussed with Stanford Graduate School of Business students Penney, Apple and Target and the lessons learned over his career in retail.

Looking back on his time at Penney, Johnson believes it was the pace of his transformation plan, as opposed to the plan itself, that was wrong. It was too fast for a company as traditional as Penney.

“Most of the things I’d done at Apple and Target worked and so you think, well, this will work too. And the reality is, you know, we moved too quickly. It was too fast for the board, the customers, employees, and shareholders,” he said.

Johnson told the students he asked to resign from Penney three times.

"I resigned three times," he said. "In February I offered to resign, in March I offered to resign, and finally in April, the board chair said ‘Ron, we’re going to accept your resignation.’"

Johnson said he ultimately came to the conclusion that Penney was not the right place for him.

“It was disappointing because I really believed we would make it work, but it was a relief because the lesson I learned is I was a terrible fit for J.C. Penney,’’ he said. “I’m a creative person, here’s a company that isn’t uber-creative. I believe in change, this company’s much more comfortable, like many people are, with the status quo.”

Click here to see the video of Johnson’s Q&A at Stanford.

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