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Yorkdale Shopping Centre adding pop-ups, high-tech messaging service

BY Marianne Wilson

Yorkdale Shopping Centre in Toronto is hoping to engage holiday shoppers with a series of pop-up shops and a online/texting messaging concierge service.

Yorkdale's holiday pop up shops include:

  • Brika is an innovative retail concept that curates and sells the work of the most talented and authentic makers, artisans and designers. Brika has had pop up locations across North America.
  • Nutra-Fruit Cranberry is a Quebec-based company that has ballooned to more than 200 employees in the past two years based on online and seasonal pop up shops.
  • Drake General Store, a popular extension of the Drake Hotel Properties, is proudly Canadian and will offer its curated curiosities, chic clothing and eclectic gifts.
  • Kit and Ace specializes in garments made from its exclusive “technical cashmere” fabrication.

In addition, the shopping center will be one of the first Canadian shopping centres to offer shoppers access to guest services teams via text or online messaging. Beginning November 1st, shoppers will have instant access to a guest service concierge for any kind of information they need to make shopping easier. The service, from Kipsu, allows for the planning for any shopping trip to start before customers even leave their home. Yorkdale guest services staff will be actively monitoring the text/messaging feature during regular shopping hours.

"We are committed to delivering an exceptional shopping experience and our Kipsu messaging concierge opens communications channels like never before," said Yorkdale general manager Claire Santamaria.

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Target Bullseye: Q&A on Tech Start-Up Accelerator Program

BY By Marianne Wilson

Target on Monday officially opened the application process for its new startup accelerator program, created in partnership with Techstars and led by Target EIR (entrepreneur-in-residence) West Stringfellow. The retailer posted a Q&A with Stringfellow, who forged Target’s partnership with Techstars, on its Bullseye blog.

Here are highlights:

You’re an Entrepreneur in Residence for Target. What does that mean?

Both parts of my job description are equally important. As an entrepreneur / intrapreneur, I’ve spent my career innovating and building new products and businesses at places like VISA, PayPal, Rosetta Stone and Amazon.The “in residence” part is key – I am a full-time Target team member with permission to do what I need to do to drive growth. And that’s really what it’s about. Target’s Entrepreneurs-in-Residence have a singular goal of launching new businesses that grow Target. And we’re only successful if we can accomplish that mission.

Why Techstars? Why does it make sense for Target?

Techstars is an awesome company. They have an improbable success rate in selecting and accelerating startups. Harvard reports that only 25% of startups survive. However, the success rate of a startup that goes through a Techstars program is closer to 90%. It’s a proven model that works. On top of that, we want our teams here at Target to learn from and think more like startups.Startups are passionate, driven, and energetic – and it’s going to be great for Target’s culture to work side-by-side with other hyper-motivated creators and innovators.

What can startups expect to gain from this experience if they’re ultimately chosen?
Techstars’ success rate speaks for itself. The chosen startups will get mentoring and access to one of the biggest and best mentoring networks in the country. They’ll get the capital to turn their ideas into reality. And they’ll go through a proven process that helps them develop their ideas, get off the ground and start their company.

What does Target look for in a startup?

Team, team, team, what market the idea is targeting, what progress has been made, and the strength of the idea. Why is team there three times? It’s critical to success. A great team can change an idea and still succeed, but a mediocre team will struggle to execute on even a great idea.
We look for people who can execute quickly, are coachable and listen well, are thoughtful but make fast decisions, are intellectually honest, are persistent, follow through and are insanely passionate about what they do. We’re looking for rock stars.

It seems like such an important part of this program is leadership and mentoring. Who are going to be Target’s mentors?

We have an awesome lineup of mentors, including Casey Carl, chief strategy and innovation officer; Jamil Ghani, VP of enterprise strategy; Jason Goldberger, president of Target.com and mobile; and me.
Depending on the types of startups we bring in, we’re also looking for mentors outside of our tech and innovation teams who have the right expertise. Our goal is to align the startups with Target team members, the Target leadership team and external experts who have the greatest potential to help them.

What makes you most excited about the program?

Three things. First, I love working with startups and seeing their passion and excitement. Working in an accelerator program is a journey of incredible intensity and creation and I’m excited to be part of it.
Second, at a corporate level, I love what it’s going to teach Target team members: that small, highly-empowered teams can achieve great things.And lastly, I can’t wait to see what this is going to do for the Twin Cities. Target is dedicated to developing a tech community in Minneapolis and this is one step in that direction.

In addition to the 10 startups, you’re also including one team from Target. Why did you decide to do that and what do you hope to gain?

We want to create the opportunity for Target team members to flex their entrepreneurial muscles, have a unique experience and then return to their roles having launched a new business. Team members who participate in the accelerator will have the opportunity to share their experience and learnings with the rest of Target and spread the knowledge.

We imagine these accelerators can extend beyond the host company and into the local community. Is that a hope here?

Absolutely. Techstars’ success depends on that. Here’s an example: Techstars worked with Ford in 2014 as part of the Techstars Mobility Accelerator. The accelerator received applications from 42 different countries, half of the participating startups established a permanent presence in Detroit, and Detroit has now attracted Startup Next and Startup Week for 2016.

We expect that our program and investment in Minneapolis will have the same impact. It’s an awesome opportunity for the city to unite. What makes Silicon Valley and other major tech hubs great are the people and the community. Target, Techstars and the Twin Cities have all of the tools to build a thriving community of innovation, entrepreneurship and technical innovation. We intend to make Minneapolis the capital of the Silicon Prairie.

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Amazon to New York Times: Get your facts straight

BY Dan Berthiaume

An Amazon.com executive is publicly disputing an August 2015New York Timesarticle that painted an unflattering picture of the retailer’s corporate culture.

Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos blasted the article in an internal memo sent to employees shortly after it was published. However, Jay Carney, senior VP for global affairs of Amazon, is replying to the article in anew poston the blogging site Medium.

Carney leads off by revealing Bo Olson, a former Amazon employee quoted in the article as saying nearly everyone he saw cried at their desk, resigned from the company after admitting to defrauding vendors. According to Carney, the Times knew this fact but did not include it in the article.

In addition, Carney says reports of employees being anonymously criticized by coworkers through an anonymous feedback tool are false. The tool is not anonymous, and an Amazon employee quoted as saying she was “strafed” only received three pieces of feedback by named employees, who all included positive comments along with constructive suggestions for improvement.

Other specific items in the article Carney disputes include an employee who claimed he was berated in a performance review before obtaining a promotion actually receiving a positive written review and promotion. Carney also provided a quote from an employee who said in the article she once didn’t sleep for four days straight clarifying that it was her choice and related to an MBA program she was in.

Furthermore, Carney says he was promised by the Times reporters writing the story that it would be a balanced and nuanced look at Amazon’s culture. Amazon’s public editor has said the article is driven more by “generalization and anecdote” than “irrefutable proof.”

“Journalism 101 instructs that facts should be checked and sources should be vetted.,” Carney wrote. “When there are two sides of a story, a reader deserves to know them both. Why did the Times choose not to follow standard practice here? We don’t know. But it’s worth noting that they’ve now twice in less than a year been called out by their own public editor for bias and hype in their coverage of Amazon.”

TheTimeson Monday afternoon published executive editorDean Baquet’s responseto Carney’s piece on Medium, in which Baquet stands behind the reporting carried out by Jodi Kantor and David Streitfeld.

“The points in today’s posting challenge the credibility of four of the more than two dozen named current or former Amazon employees quoted in the story or cast doubt on their veracity,” the post said. ”The information for the most part, though, did not contradict what the former employees said in our story; instead, you mostly asserted that there were no records of what the workers were describing. Of course, plenty of conversations and interactions occur in workplaces that are not documented in personnel files.

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