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Ahold Delhaize brings its U.S. companies together under new parent company, CEO

BY Michael Johnsen

Ahold Delhaize on Thursday named Kevin Holt CEO of its newly minted Ahold Delhaize USA division, which will serve as the parent company for all of Ahold Delhaize’s U.S. companies, including its local brands, Stop & Shop, Food Lion, Giant, Hannaford, Giant/Martin’s and Peapod, as well as Retail Business Services, the U.S. shared services company providing support to the brands.

“Combining the parent companies of the U.S. brands and RBS is the natural next step in our brand-centric strategy in the U.S.,” Ahold Delhaize CEO Dick Boer said. “Kevin is an outstanding leader with extensive food retail experience and a great choice to guide our U.S. businesses through this time of continuing change and evolving customer expectations.”

Kevin holtHolt currently is COO of Ahold USA. In this new role, effective Jan. 1, 2018, he will remain a member of Ahold Delhaize’s management board and executive committee and will continue to report Boer.

“I’m excited that we are moving into this next phase where we can focus on further strengthening our brands and winning in our markets,” Holt said. “Ahold Delhaize USA and its U.S. brands are well positioned to continue to drive growth and innovation and meet the evolving needs of customers, both in stores and online.”

The company said that Frans Muller, deputy CEO Ahold Delhaize and chief integration officer, who serves as acting COO Delhaize America will focus on the continued smooth integration of Ahold Delhaize.

Holt joined Delhaize Group in 2014 as CEO Delhaize America and transitioned to COO Ahold USA in 2017. Prior to joining Ahold Delhaize, he served in executive leadership roles at Supervalu and Meijer.

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Patagonia joins lawsuit to block Trump’s national monuments order

BY Marianne Wilson

Patagonia has never backed down from speaking up for what it believes, however controversial it may be.

The outdoor apparel retailer joined a broad coalition that is suing to strike down what it termed “the President’s extreme overreach of authority in revoking the Bears Ears National Monument.” The plaintiffs — Patagonia Works, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Utah Diné Bikéyah, Friends of Cedar Mesa, Archaeology Southwest, Conservation Lands Foundation, Access Fund, and the Society for Vertebrate Paleontology — filed the complaint in federal court in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 7.

The lawsuit attempts to “declare unlawful President Trump’s December 4, 2017 proclamation that revoked the Bear Ears National Monument and replaced it with two new ‘units.'” It claims the act exceeds a president’s authority under the Antiquities Act of 1906 and wants the original configuration of the monument restored.

“President Trump’s proclamation is the first time any president has attempted to abolish a monument established by a previous president and amounts to the largest elimination of protected areas in American history,” the coalition stated. “By revoking national monument status for 85% of the area protected by the Bears Ears National Monument, President Trump has removed legal protections for many well-known and widely-revered historic, scientific, and cultural areas.”

“I think the only thing this administration understands is lawsuits,” Patagonia’s legendary founder and ardent environmentalist Yvon Choinard told CNN.

Patagonia replaced the imagery on its homepage with a dramatic message, “The President Stole Your Land.”

“In an illegal move, the president just reduced the size of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments,” the message reads. “This is the largest elimination of protected land in American history.” The home page has a “Take Action Now” button.

The Patagonia post attracted the attention of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who called it “nefarious, false and a lie.”

As of Thursday morning, Patagonia had not taken down the pointed message.

“We’ve fought to protect these places since we were founded and now we’ll continue that fight in the courts,” stated Rose Marcario, president and CEO of Patagonia, who wrote a column for Time explaining why the company had joined the lawsuit.

The lawsuit’s defendants include Trump, Zinke, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, Deputy Director of the Bureau of Land Management Brian Steed, and Chief of the U.S. Forest Service Tony Tooke.

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G.Wagnon says:
Dec-08-2017 08:43 am

More money than common sense Are these environmental groups totally out of touch? If they were serious they would not be suing individuals but the federal government instead. If they really want protection it must come from congress

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Walmart changing its name to reflect its new focus

BY Marianne Wilson

Walmart is ending a 48-year habit by removing word “stores” out of its legal name.

The discounter on Wednesday announced that it is changing its legal name from Wal-Mart Stores to Walmart Inc., effective Feb. 1, 2018. The move reflects the chain’s growing emphasis on e-commerce and its positioning as a retailer with integrated online and offline operations.

“Our customers know us as Walmart and today they shop with us not only in our stores but online and with our app as well,” said Doug McMillon, Walmart president and CEO. “While our legal name is used in a limited number of places, we felt it was best to have a name that was consistent with the idea that you can shop us however you like as a customer.”

In a blog post on the company’s web site, McMillon said the change not only the company’s strategy to win the future of retail, but is also a bit about returning to the company’s roots.

You might be surprised to learn that, when Sam Walton opened the first store in 1962, the name on the front of the building was simply, “Walmart.” A few years later, we incorporated as Wal-Mart, Inc., and amended the name to Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., when we went public in 1970,” McMillon wrote.

Walmart operates under nearly 60 different banners around the world, including e-commerce sites, and has more than 11,600 stores and clubs in 28 countries. It will continue to trade on the NYSE as WMT.

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