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Study: Amazon’s market share is on the upswing cross-category — but not all of them

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Amazon continues to eat market share across diverse product categories, especially commodities.

The online giant has more than 80% of conversions in the first quarter of 2018 compared to other e-commerce sites across diverse product categories, according to the “State of the Amazon Era Data Report, Q1 2018,” from Jumpshot. (The company studied anonymous consumer actions within 500 online e-commerce sites and marketplaces in the first quarter of 2018, then analyzed visits and conversions of different brand categories across these sites.)

According to the data, Amazon has the highest market share for the quarter with one-click commodity product categories, such as batteries (97%) and cleaning supplies (88%). Cleaning supplies specifically, shows the highest quarter-over-quarter growth, at 13%, the study said.

Amazon also dominated across branded product categories, including men’s athletic shoes (74%).

One area that Amazon has yet to crack compared to other brands is private label. The company’s Amazon Basics line comprises 88% of Amazon’s private label merchandise. Excluding this line however, the online giant only had 7% market share of private label sales in Q1.

Amazon lead private label market share only in the electronics category. Among AmazonBasics, electronics made up 45% of private label conversions. The rest of the company’s private label conversions are comprised of home, office and pet merchandise, according to the study.

When it comes to private label conversion share, Amazon is responsible for 61%. The remaining 39% is comprised of sales from Walmart, Target and Macy’s. However, without the electronics category, Walmart, Target and Macy’s have 74% share of conversions.

The area where these players are focusing their private label efforts are in women’s clothing and home. For example, 34% of Walmart’s Q1 private label conversions were in the home category, and 4% in women’s clothing, while Macy’s had 52% conversions in women’s clothing. Target trailed behind with 39% of conversions across both women’s clothing (17%) and home (16%) (the children’s category made up the remaining 6%).

“Amazon, Walmart, Target and Macy’s are placing bets in different product categories,” the study explained.

“In the Amazon Era where consumers continually shop and purchase across various e-commerce sites, the big players like Amazon, Walmart.com and Target have an unfair advantage,” the study continued. “They have customer insights and data across all brands — that marketers may not have access to –- and are making decisions of where to invest and build private labels. In order to build powerful products and brands, and grow market share, marketers should have access to the same kind of data and insights from within these walled garden e-commerce sites.”

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The most popular online platforms among teens are…

BY Marianne Wilson

Move over Facebook.

Until recently, Facebook had dominated the social media landscape among America’s youth—but it is no longer the most popular online platform among U.S. teens (ages 13 to 17), according to a new survey by Pew Research Center.  Roughly half (51%) of teens say they use Facebook. By contrast, 85% say they use YouTube, 72% use Instagram, and 69% use Snapchat. (Multiple responses were allowed in the survey.)

The social media landscape in which teens reside looks markedly different than it did as recently as three years ago, according to the study. In the Center’s 2014-2015 survey of teen social media use, 71% of teens reported being Facebook users. No other platform was used by a clear majority of teens at the time.

Lower-income teens are more likely to gravitate toward Facebook than those from higher-income households, the survey revealed. There are also a few differences related to gender and to race and ethnicity when it comes to teens’ most-used sites.

Girls are more likely than boys to say Snapchat is the site they use most often (42% vs. 29%), while boys are more inclined than girls to identify YouTube as their go-to platform (39% vs. 25%). White teens (41%) are more likely than Hispanic (29%) or black (23%) teens to say Snapchat is the online platform they use most often, while black teens are more likely than whites to identify Facebook as their most used site (26% vs. 7%).

The report also found that smartphone ownership is nearly universal among teens of different genders, races and ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. Some 95% of teens now say they have or have access to a smartphone, up 22% from the 73% of teens who said this in 2014-2015.

Additional findings from the Pew survey include:
• Some 45% of teens say they use the internet “almost constantly,” nearly double from the 24% who said this in the 2014-2015 survey.

• Half of teenage girls (50%) are near-constant online users, compared with 39% of teenage boys.

•Overall, 84% of teens say they have or have access to a game console at home, and 90% say they play video games of any kind (whether on a computer, game console or cellphone).

 

 

 

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Walmart rolling out new dress code, scheduling app for employees

BY Marianne Wilson

Walmart kicked off its 48th annual shareholders meeting on Wednesday with an announcement that drew cheers from the audience, which included thousands of associates from around the globe.

Under new guidelines that go into effect on June 4, Walmart employees across all 4,700 stores in the U.S. are now free to wear jeans—of any color—along with shirts of any color or pattern. In another change, management is now free to join hourly employees and wear sneakers at work. (The chain’s iconic vest and name badge will remain as is.) Walmart also is removing most restrictions on hairstyles, tattoos and piercings.

“We want you to wear what makes you feel good,” Todd Harbaugh, executive VP of Walmart Neighborhood Markets, said at the meeting, which was held in the Bud Walton Arena in Fayetteville, Ark. “ And we want you to be yourself at Walmart.”

In another initiative that is likely to go over big with associates, Walmart said it is piloting a scheduling app, called My Walmart Schedule, that is designed provide associates with more predictability and flexibility to manage family life – and work life. The app is now live in about 500 pilot stores.

Using the app, associates have new options for picking up additional hours to help create a schedule that works for them. They can also pick up unfilled shifts and have visibility to all approved time off requests. If they like, they can even swap and exchange shifts with co-workers, the retailer said.

“If an unexpected thing comes up in your life, you can make sure your shift is covered,” Mark Ibbotson, executive VP of Central Operations for Walmart U.S., said at the meeting.

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