OPERATIONS

Warehouse club is stepping up personalization execution

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

A new platform is positioning BJ’s Wholesale Club to better connect with individual shoppers.

By expanding its partnership with Toshiba Global Commerce Solutions, the warehouse club plans to add the technology provider’s TCx Vector solution. These retail applications will help BJ’s deliver more personalized offers to its members.

The new solution provides a comprehensive approach to planning and executing promotions and loyalty programs. The platform is designed to provides actionable insights needed to efficiently plan and execute targeted promotions.

BJ’s plans to integrate the technology within its continued rollout and expansion of self-checkout systems and other mobile shopping solutions. Both companies will also focus on the rapid development and deployment of new capabilities through the TCx Elevate digital commerce platform — a move that will bridge all of BJ’s channels, touchpoints and apps together. As a result, BJ’s can deliver more engaging customer experiences, improve productivity and increase profits, according to Toshiba.

“We are committed to making shopping at BJ’s even more convenient, and strengthening our relationship with our members,” said Scott Kessler, executive VP, CIO, BJ’s. “We look forward to expanding our partnership with Toshiba in order to deliver rapid innovation with TCx Vector and the Toshiba TCx Elevate Platform.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

What will your company do with the tax-reform windfall?
OPERATIONS

Study: Retailers make technology a key priority for 2018

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Using technology to improve the shopping experience is topping a majority of retailers’ 2018 to-do lists.

More than half (53%) of retailers will focus on leveraging technology to improve the shopping experience this year. This is an impressive jump from the 27% of retailers feel their current infrastructure is already capable of improving the in-store experience, according to a report from Zynstra, a software provider of intelligent edge infrastructure.

According to the data, only one-quarter of retailers said their in-store IT allowed them to frequently and regularly improve their in-store experience. Meanwhile, one-fifth said they had to delay or reject a past roll out of new in-store applications because of IT limitations, costs or concerns.

Retailers also plan to use technology to improve operational efficiencies (44%), enhance security and compliance of in-store IT (42%), drive in-store innovation (34%), mitigate the risk of end-of-life technology (27%), and incorporate all engagement channels in a single platform (17%).

“In today’s retail environment, particularly those organizations with a distributed branch network, having the right technology in place to support both operations and overall customer experience is a key competitive advantage,” said Nick East, CEO, Zynstra. “Increasingly, we’re finding the biggest impact on store cost and day-to-day operational efficiency improvements lie in implementing an intelligent edge infrastructure with end-to-end management and control.”

According to results, virtualization of point-of-sale systems is also playing an increasingly important role in in-store efficiency. Twenty-three percent of retailers said they already use the technology, while 26% said they would adopt it as soon as possible, and 21% said they would do so in the next two years.

“2018 is a crucial year in laying down the infrastructure that will reduce costs today and provide a long-term platform for a consistent and intentional customer experience,” said East. “In the challenging retail conditions that are predicted, those who don’t take this step are going to lose out.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

What will your company do with the tax-reform windfall?
OPERATIONS

Whole Foods Market putting new limits on vendors

BY CSA Staff

Under the ownership of Amazon, Whole Foods Market is changing the way some products are sold in its stores — and asking vendors to help pay for them.

The changes, outlined in an email sent to the grocer’s suppliers, are intended to save on costs and centralize operations, reported the Washington Post, and come as Amazon pushes to reduce prices at Whole Foods’ stores.

Previously, Whole Foods allowed small mom-and-pop suppliers to oversee their own merchandise or hire local firms to do so. But under the new rules, suppliers must work exclusively with Stamford, Conn.-based retail strategy firm Daymon, and its subsidiary, SAS Retail Services, to schedule in-store tastings, check inventory on shelves and create displays on their behalf, according to the report. And suppliers are being required to help fund the effort, The Post said. For example, suppliers that sell more than $300,000 of goods annually to Whole Foods will be required to discount their products by 3% (for groceries) or 5% (for health and beauty products) to fund the new program.

Click here to read more.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

What will your company do with the tax-reform windfall?