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STORE SPACES

Innovative supermarket looks to nourish neighborhood from ‘inside out’

BY Marianne Wilson

North Market puts an innovative spin on supermarket retailing.

Built with the community, for the community, North Market combines a full-service, approximate 16,000-sq.-ft. grocery store with a community space as well as a clinic space for health and wellness services — all under one roof. The project was designed by Minneapolis-based Knock, in partnership with LSE Architects, which transformed a vacant building into a vibrant and colorful space.

North Market is owned and operated by Minneapolis-based non-profit organization Pillsbury United Communities as an independent, self-sustaining social enterprise. It is located in the Webber Park neighborhood of north Minneapolis, a low-income area that has been federally designated as a food desert. Prior to North Market’s opening, the community was served by 36 corner-style convenience store and only one supermarket.

North Market aims to serve the local community from the inside out. With an emphasis on nutrition and healthy eating, it is a hub for community health, offering regular wellness events and education.

Approximately half of the grocery stock in North Market is supplied by Supervalu, with the remaining coming from local produce, meat and dairy suppliers. Products made in North Minneapolis are given dedicated shelf space. North Memorial provides health services on nutrition and pharmaceutical management.

In designing North Market, Knock engaged the surrounding community to create a design that would most resonate with them and meet their needs. The color orange, for example, which is dominant throughout the space, was selected as Knock found it resonated deeper with the roots of African-American and Latinx cultures.

The project was funded by various philanthropic and corporate partners, with Cargill Foundation and Otto Bremer Trust two of the biggest funders. Others include General Mills, who has also provided in-kind support, and Target. The biggest donor to the project, however, was the State of Minnesota.

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STORE SPACES

Top construction technology trends

BY Marianne Wilson

New tech tools are playing an increasingly important role in construction — and drones are one of the biggest trends.

That’s one of the findings of Software Connect’s “Construction Technology Trends—2018” report, which surveyed 158 construction industry professionals from small to midsize (SMB) businesses in North America, including retail.

“Drones emerged as the leading trend,” stated David Budiac, a managing partner at Software Connect. “For instance, while a traditional surveyor would spend up to a month to survey a construction job site in detail, a construction company called Identified Technologies uses self-flying drones to complete the same work within minutes, greatly expediting project time-frames and reducing physical labor costs.”

Here are the key findings from the report:

• Expect drones to be commonplace. 26% of small-to mid-size business (SMB) construction professionals are already using or plan to use by 2020.

• Expect larger tech budgets. 81% of respondents plan to spend more on technology over the coming year compared to last.

• Project tracking, estimating, and job costing are the most commonly required software functions.

• Software ease-of-use is king. Cited as the most important factor when purchasing new software; even over software functionality and cost.

• Construction software buyers are more willing to review cloud-hosted software. 5% more than all other industries.

Interestingly, 3D printing had the lowest adoption rate in the survey. Only 4% of contractors use the technology today, and an additional 7% plan to adopt it by 2020.

To see the complete survey, click here.

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Photo: Paulsta for lululemon
Photo: Paulsta for lululemon
Photo: Paulsta for lululemon
STORE SPACES

Lululemon puts the art in experiential retailing

BY Marianne Wilson

Lululemon Athletica is shaking things up in New York City.

The retailer has transformed its 3,500-sq.-ft. community and studio space located in the basement of its Manhattan Flatiron store into an immersive environment with a “sweat in the concrete jungle” theme. Since 2015, the space — officially called HUB Seventeen — has been an intersection for art, culture and connection, offering everything from weekly yoga and dance classes to movie screenings. In addition to a fitness studio, it has free WiFi, and communal tables for work/meetings for any and all visitors.

The recent transformation was created by Good Luck Dry Cleaners, a disruptive, art-focused cultural brand that creates speakeasy-esque pop-up exhibits. It features installations by local New York City artists as well as rotating works from the Good Luck Dry Cleaners team.

“As our summer HUB Seventeen artist residents, we are thrilled to have Jeremy Penn and Phil Reese of Good Luck Dry Cleaners and local New York artists transform our HUB into an interactive, fun place to work, meet and sweat,” said HUB Seventeen curator Carolina Amorim. “We are honored to support and showcase local artists that create beautiful, fun and approachable art.”

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