TECHNOLOGY

Study: Engaging content driving grocery sales on Amazon

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Grocery brands that feature more robust brand pages are Amazon’s top performers.

Among nearly half a million product pages in Amazon’s Grocery & Gourmet Foods category, those with longer product descriptions, images, videos and bullet points outperformed the competition, according to “The Winning Elements of an Amazon Grocery Page,” a report from Salsify.

According to data, titles with benefit-laden language, image and/or written copy with prominent dietary information, and below-the-fold content that highlights positive brand attributes in detail, are prevalent on the brand pages that stand out on Amazon. This data can help guide grocery brands selling on Amazon when evaluating their product content.

In the Under $10 — impulse purchase category, for example, the top performing brands focused on use cases and dietary information. Following this formula, top performers used an average of 477 characters, the poor performer average was 294.1 characters. Top performing brands had an average of 4 bullets of information, while poor performing brands had an average of 2.9. When it came to images, top performers used 5.4 images, while poor performing brands used 2.1.

In the $10-$19.99 — volume packaging category, high performing brands offered variety, and didn’t skimp on marketing. Top performers had an average of 557.6 characters, compared to 293 among poor performers. Bullets topped out at an average of 4.4 among top brands compared to 3 on poor performers. Top performers images were 6 compared to 2.3 of poor performers.

When evaluating the $20-$29.99— high-end volume packaging category, top brands focus heavily on their value proposition. For example, top performers had an average of 710.8 characters in their description vs. 312.7. Bullets were 4.6 compared to 3.3, and top performers’ 6.1 images eclipsed poor performers’ 1.9 images.

When comparing the $30-$39.99 — bulk products and long-term stock-ups, top-selling companies build trust and loyalty with value and expert language. Top performers had an average of 665 characters in their descriptions compared to 346.8 among poor performers. Top brands featured 4.7 bullets vs. 3.1, and had 5.7 images compared to 1.8.

Among the $40-$49.99— high-end bulk products and long-term stock-ups, high-end terminology is driving sales. Top performers featured an average of 679 characters in their descriptions, compared to 354.8 of poor performers. Meanwhile, they had 4.6 vs 3.7 bullets, and 5.4 images compared to 2.5.

“Top performers at every price point consistently had longer average descriptions, more multimedia assets, and more bullets, as opposed to poor performers,” the study said. “Successful brands are speaking to their prospective customers with engaging content, in a way that takes into account Amazon’s algorithm, unique user experience, and shopper journey.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Do you think retail brands should steer clear of taking a stance on social and political issues?
TECHNOLOGY

Lingerie brand offers a new kind of personal stylist

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Cosabella is stepping up its personalization efforts — and they are paying off.

Through its partnership with Snap+Style Business, the lingerie brand launched a SaaS-based customer-facing personalization and discovery platform. Called “StyleWidget,” customers can submit a personalized styling request directly on Cosabella’s desktop or mobile site. In return, they receive real-time, personal recommendations from store associates.

“Snap+Style Business is allowing us to convert our in-store associates into in-home stylists, communicating directly with our consumers through our e-commerce site,” said Guido Campello, CEO of Cosabella.

Here’s how it works: As customers submit a styling request online or via mobile, Cosabella’s in-house stylists respond via email with a curated selection of merchandise designed exclusively for the customer. The personalized assortment encourages the customer to continue engaging with the brand, as well as make a purchase.

“In the past six months, when a customer submitted a request using Snap+Style Business on our site, 30% of the time it converted to a sale, with a larger average order value [AOV] than those who didn’t,” said Campello. “It is truly a game changer for us.

The solution is also capable of driving units per transaction (UPT) and lifetime customer value, according to Snap+Style Business.

“The retail landscape in fashion continues to evolve into a digital-first shopping experience, even at the luxury level,” said Campello. “Customer service is more important than ever, with stylists now entering your home to dress and educate you.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Do you think retail brands should steer clear of taking a stance on social and political issues?
TECHNOLOGY

Study: Mobile purchases climbing rapidly

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Mobile shopping may still have a long way to catch up to online shopping, but the gap is closing — quickly.

American adult consumers that reported mobile Internet activity in the past 30 days reached 52%, up roughly 50% in just four years, according to “Digital Payments in the U.S.: Consumer Usage, Wallets and P2P,” a report from Packaged Facts.

According to the data, banking-related mobile activity grew at faster rate (up an average of 16% annually). However, the fastest-growing category was purchase-related mobile activity, which was up an average of 28% annually. This suggests that mobile access is translating quickly to mobile commerce.

In 2017, more than a third (39%) of online purchasers reported making a mobile purchase, up from less than 20% of online purchasers in 2013. Similarly, banking and gathering information for shopping is climbing.

This trend underscores the importance of mobile checkout schemes that make the mobile purchase experience simple and seamless, and the need to smoothly integrate them into the mobile shopping experience, the study revealed.

While smartphone ownership was once the more exclusive domain of younger adults, it is now more evenly spread across all age groups — except for senior over age 75. Similarly, the age gap separating online purchasing behavior has narrowed over time, although online purchasing among 25-44 year-olds is at least 20% more likely than average.

On the downside, mobile-related behavior remains strongly differentiated by age. Trends over time suggest that usage barriers remain among older adults and that mobile purchasing among Millennials ages 18-24 is running counter to industry expectations. Adults age 25-44 are at least 40% more likely than average to have made a mobile purchase in 2017.

While this behavior was generally almost three time more prevalent in 2017 than in 2013, statement agreement among 18-24s relative to other age groups declined during this period, according to the report.

“The percentage of adults who prefer mobile Internet access over computer-based access has continued to grow,” said David Sprinkle, research director for Packaged Facts. “The question now becomes how can the payments industry better translate this uptick into broader consumer interest in making in-store mobile payments.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Do you think retail brands should steer clear of taking a stance on social and political issues?