OPERATIONS

C-store tailors store-level assortments with customized planograms

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

The parent company of convenience store brands such as Red’s, Two Chicks, and Luigi’s Pizzas & Subs, is offering customer-centric assortments across all of its stores.

GPM Investments, which operates more than 1,200 company-operated convenience stores across the Mid-Atlantic, Midwestern, Northeastern and Southeastern United States, is partnering with JDA Software to create planograms for specific store formats and brands. By analyzing customer needs, GPM can now customize planograms for each store and style of fixture.

Using a range of JDA Category Management solutions, the company creates localized, actionable shelf plans that are specific to each store, and customized to customer needs based on store sales and trending information. With JDA, GPM no longer relies on vendors to provide the planograms for their products and stores. Instead, the company now creates, maintains and supports multiple versions for each location.

Within 14 weeks, GPM has quadrupled the number of planograms that it can support. The company also has the flexibility to create and maintain store-specific planograms, and can publish the plans with increased speed and accuracy.

“GPM Investments is off to a very strong start with a quick implementation that will give them the visibility they need into shopper habits and buying trends to create the right mix of shelf and floor plans that exceed their customers’ expectations,” said Terry Turner, president, North American retail, JDA.

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OPERATIONS

How mobile workforce tools are a huge win for both management and staff

BY Shyft Technologies

Earlier this year Shyft Technologies Inc. completed an implementation of our software with a global retailer’s 100,000+ user workforce. Our newly available Retail Case Study shares the findings from our initial pilot POC.

Download Shyft’s Retail Case Study here!

In this report, we reveal valuable insights regarding worker scheduling, flexibility needs and coverage patterns. Our data shows how empowering workers with mobile schedule-management tools drives conversion, increases morale and can save millions in labor costs.

How shift swapping occurred prior to Shyft

Our findings show that stores were still using antiquated methods to swap shifts and manage their schedules; 35% used text messages and 34% used Facebook groups.  11% still used Post-It Notes!

With employee adoption of Shyft, users called out notable time-savings. 30% of managers reported that Shyft was saving them 4 or more hours a week.

30% of managers reported that Shyft was saving them 4 or more hours a week.

This time saved away from scheduling headaches allows managers to be on the floor, selling products and resolving customer service issues. This is a far better use of a manager’s time versus scrolling through employee phone lists looking for shift coverage.

In addition to managing the scheduling complexities for frontline workers, Shyft’s record keeping and data processing abilities have also proven to be valuable. With nationwide trends in the introduction of new scheduling compliance legislation, the need for this type of electronic record keeping is only expected to grow.

Allowing for flexibility is essential to creating an engaged and empowered workforce. Our study shows that 48% of employees know within a window of 2 days or less that they need a shift covered.  Without a mobile management tool, the likelihood of that employee finding last-minute coverage decreases, while the likelihood that they would have to call out goes up.

Advanced notice for shift swapping

It is worth calling out that in addition to time-savings, Shyft boosts morale and employee retention. 71% of respondents stated that they feel Shyft has helped in decreasing employee turnover at their location.

Most importantly, an average of 95% of our users reported they would recommend Shyft to friends looking to get a shift covered.

Download our Retail Case Study here.

We are excited to share our experience with you and look forward to your feedback!

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S.Davison says:
Sep-15-2018 02:08 am

Nice info.. Mobile workforce tools have created a huge demand for both retail and software management and staff.

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High-end fashion brand takes new stance on unsold, fur-based merchandise

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

British luxury fashion house Burberry Group is taking steps to improve its social and environmental reputation.

Burberry announced that it will stop the practice of destroying unsold products. The decision coincides with the company’s five-year responsibility plan to reduce the causes of waste across the organization, as well as within the communities it operates in. The company said it already reuses, repairs, donates or recycles unsaleable products, and plans to expand these efforts.

Burberry’s new waste practices also come on the heels of the company’s confession that it destroyed almost $40 million worth of stock last year. The practice sparked an uproar over waste in the fashion industry, according to Reuters.

Separately, the luxury fashion brand announced that it will no longer sell merchandise that features real fur, including rabbit, fox, mink and Asiatic raccoon and Angora. In addition to phasing out real fur products, the company’s Riccardo Tisci debut collection set to launch later this month will not feature real fur.

“Modern luxury means being socially and environmentally responsible. This belief is core to us at Burberry and key to our long-term success,” said Marco Gobbetti, CEO, Burberry. “We are committed to applying the same creativity to all parts of Burberry as we do to our products.”

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