OPERATIONS

Starbucks needs to do more to eliminate racial bias, say advisors

BY Marianne Wilson

Four hours of dedicated training isn’t enough to wipe out racial bias among Starbucks Corp. employees, according to a report by its advisors.

The report, was written by Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Heather McGhee, distinguished senior fellow at Demos, a public policy organization. It comes approximately one month after the coffee giant closed its U.S. corporate-owned stores for an afternoon of racial bias training.

“We’ve been clear from day one that a single training alone could not address racial bias across the entire Starbucks organization,” stated Ifill in a news release announcing the study, which was done in consultation with dozens of organizations and experts, from racial and religious groups to legal and policy centers.

The report calls for Starbucks to revamp its hiring, training and promotion procedures. Among specific recommendations, it suggests that Starbucks conduct an internal audit to examine any customer service bias. It calls on Starbucks to deepen its connections to local communities, and consult with local experts about gentrification and discriminatory policing. It advises Starbucks to have an “independent racial equity consultant” create a detailed plan for future diversity and anti-bias training sessions.

Shortly before the report was released, Starbucks announced it is already acting on some of the suggestions outlined in it. Later this summer, the retailer will roll out the first in a series of new trainings on a range of topics that build on the May anti-bias session. Over the next year, 12 training modules will roll out – six targeted to managers and above and six for all associates.

Some of the topics include cultural perspectives, engaging with empathy, gratitude, building diverse teams and more. Similar to the previous training, 23,000 specially modified iPads will guide employees through the experience.

“It’s not solely diversity training,” said Roz Brewer, COO, Starbucks. “We’re addressing issues around leadership. We’re offering new tools. And ultimately, we hope to take our partners on a journey.”

Starbucks said it is also in the early stages of planning a conference next year for more than 15,000 store managers and leaders to continue conversations about bias and look for ways to be more inclusive.

“We want to thank the advisors and all of the people who offered their counsel, recommendations and advice,” stated Vivek Varma, executive VP of public affairs. “We’re listening and reflecting. We’re open minded and have more to do.”

Click here to read the report.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

What impact do you expect the new tariffs on imports will have on the economy?
OPERATIONS

Ace Hardware simplifies workforce tasks across stores

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

A new solution is helping Ace Hardware associates reduce scheduling tasks, and uphold its signature focus on the customer experience.

By partnering with workforce management software company Deputy, Ace Hardware will have a solution that will streamline efficient operations and optimize workforce management practices across some stores. Overall, it will help stores better manage its hourly workforce.

The cloud-based solution supports mobile clocking in and out capabilities, scheduling, meal and break compliance, task-tracking and performance management. This frees up managers and associates to spend time serving customers.

“I used to spend up to eight hours a week creating my staff’s schedules,” said Darrell Moseley, owner of Ace Hardware Hillyard, in North Spokane, Washington. “With Deputy’s integrated timesheet and scheduling feature, this previously laborious task only takes a couple hours, leaving my time open to pay attention to other critical matters — bettering our store’s performance.”

Ace Hardware is a retail cooperative with more than 5,000 locations locally-owned and operated across the globe.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

What impact do you expect the new tariffs on imports will have on the economy?
OPERATIONS

Adidas targeted by hackers

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Adidas is the latest company to suffer a data breach.

On Friday, the athletics giant began alerting customers that an unauthorized source made its way into its website. The hacker claims to have acquired limited data associated with certain Adidas consumers, according to the company.

Pilfered data includes contact information, usernames and encrypted passwords. No credit card or fitness information was compromised.

The company estimated the breach has impacted “a few million consumers,” an Adidas spokeswoman said in an email to Bloomberg.

Upon learning about the breach, the athletics retailer immediately began taking steps to determine the scope of the issue and to alert relevant consumers. Adidas continues to work with leading data security firms and law enforcement authorities to investigate the issue.

Other retailers targeted by cyber-thieves this year include Hudson’s Bay Co.’s Saks, Saks Off Fifth and Lord & Taylor brands, Best Buy, Panera Bread, Sears Holdings, and Under Armour.

“Retail websites have become a fertile hunting ground for attackers targeting customer data,” Fred Kneip, CEO, CyberGRX.

“Even when organizations do everything they can do safeguard their data, attackers have gotten very good at going through third parties to find a way in,” he added. “The Fort Knox approach of making your organization impenetrable simply doesn’t work today because so many third parties have access to your network. It only takes a single vulnerability within any of those third parties to put sensitive data at risk.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

What impact do you expect the new tariffs on imports will have on the economy?