STORE SPACES

Survey: Food quality, cleanliness key to supermarket experience

BY Marianne Wilson

An annual survey reveals the major factors that enter into the supermarket experience.

Supermarket shoppers rated quality/freshness of the product (4.45 on a 5-point scale) and cleanliness of the store (4.40) as the two strongest core experience factors, according to Retail Feedback Group’s 2017 U.S. Supermarket Experience Study. Associate friendliness – the highest-rated service factor – received a more moderate rating of 4.34, followed by associate helpfulness/knowledge (4.24), checkout speed/efficiency (4.23) and associate availability (4.19).

Value for the money spent received the lowest score among all core experience factors, at 4.18. Shoppers at discount grocer Aldi give value for money the highest marks (4.68), and also score Aldi higher than supermarkets on checkout speed (4.30). Walmart shoppers give lower scores on the all the core experience factors.

The survey findings point to a critical need for grocery retailers with a physical presence to step up their game, according to RFG principal Doug Madenberg.

“When people shop in a supermarket, the overall experience, assortment, and value proposition need to be excellent in order to earn their next visit,” he said. “There are too many grocery options available online, in hard discount stores, and across other formats, for an average or sub-par supermarket visit to be acceptable.”

In other survey findings:

• Supermarket shoppers gave an overall satisfaction rating of 4.42 before 3 p.m., but this mark fell to 4.36 between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Several factor ratings were substantially lower after 3 p.m. than earlier in the day, including cleanliness, quality/freshness, staff friendliness, and value for the money.

• Seventy-six percent of shoppers refer to one or more advertising/sales vehicles — traditional, social, mobile and digital — before or during the visit.

• Millennials scored supermarkets the lowest on all core experience factors, as well as overall trip satisfaction. Boomers, on the other hand, rated overall trip experience and nearly all core experience factors highest (and only one area — staff knowledge/helpfulness — was rated equal by both Boomers and Gen X).

“The fact that overall trip satisfaction and all of the core experience factors register lowest among millennials should be a call to action for supermarkets,” said Madenberg. “Traditional supermarkets must find ways to make the supermarket more appealing and relevant to younger shoppers or risk becoming endangered as boomers age and purchase less.”

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Photo Credit: Erin Leydon
Photo Credit: Erin Leydon
Photo Credit: Erin Leydon
Photo Credit: Erin Leydon
Photo Credit: Erin Leydon
STORE SPACES

First Look: Woolrich in expansion mode as its enters Canada

BY CSA STAFF

America’s oldest outdoor clothing company has opened its first store in Canada, at Yorkdale Shopping Centre, Toronto, as part of a robust expansion strategy.

Woolrich International was created in November 2016 through a merger between Woolrich Europe and Woolrich Inc. The company plans to open more than 60 Woolrich stores worldwide by 2020, including two more in Canada.

The 2,800-sq.-ft. Woolrich at Yorkdale reflects the company’s 187-year old history, merged with a modern, sophisticated aesthetic. The facade features the venerable brand’s signature red-and-white black Woolrich Buffalo Check plaid. The interior, which reinterprets the brand’s global store concept designed by Japanese architecture firm Wonderwall, immerses shoppers in the world of Woolrich.

The store features Woolrich’s men’s and women’s collections, accessories along with its new footwear line.

Founded in 1830 in Pennsylvania, Woolrich is America’s oldest manufacturer of outdoor wear.

For more slideshows, click here.

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Regional home improvement retailer sets store expansion

BY Marianne Wilson

Pittsburgh-based Busy Beaver will be living up to its name next year.

The neighborhood home improvement retailer will open five new stores in 2018, including a location in March, in Grove City, Pennsylvania. Additional locations will be announced. Busy Beaver currently operates 18 stores in three states (Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia).

At 50,000 sq. ft. the Grove City location will be larger than the 35,000-sq.ft. average of its other 18 stores. It will feature an expanded seasonal department, an indoor lumber yard, a new farm and ranch department, and a designated contractor service center.

“We’re excited about our continued expansion plans for Busy Beaver during the next year across the entire region. Starting with Grove City, we’ll be pleased to offer local residents and businesses a customer-friendly store experience that addresses the needs of DIYers and supports local contractors,” said Joe Kallen, CEO, Busy Beaver. “As with all our stores, we want customers served by our new locations to know they can count on finding what they need, and getting friendly, expert help, every time they visit.”

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