TECHNOLOGY

NetSuite helps foundation meet its mission—to fight childhood cancer

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

A non-profit is stepping up its fight against childhood cancer with a new platform that will manage its financial and marketing operations.

Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) is a national non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for research into new treatments and cures for children battling cancer. The firm was inspired by Alexandra Scott’s personal battle with neuroblastoma, a childhood form of cancer, and her initial lemonade stand that she opened when she was just four years old. Since its inception, the foundation has raised more than $150 million — and continues to grow.

To manage this growth, the foundation is partnering with NetSuite, a move that will enable it to optimize its financial operations, donor relations and marketing programs.

The solution will eliminate previously manual and time-consuming processes, enabling the foundation to focus on its mission and launch new initiatives — including the way the funds are dispersed. Specifically, the platform will manage grant distribution, an expanding range of fundraising events, and keep administration costs low to ensure donors’ money is going to the mission.

“We’re focused on continuing Alex’s fight to bring an end to childhood cancer, and support the many families and medical professionals involved in that struggle,” said Liz Scott, Alex’s mother and co-executive director of the foundation. “As we continue to expand into research of our own, we needed a system that could support our growth and help us better manage our operations. NetSuite was the answer.”

To date, the ALSF has funded more than 800 research projects at 135 hospitals, and provided support for families that are forced to travel get cancer treatments. In 2017, the foundation created the Childhood Cancer Data Lab, which features a team of data scientists, engineers and designers that leverage publicly available sources to make cancer data and analysis widely available, easily mineable and broadly reusable.

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Walmart’s technology division goes on a hiring spree

BY CSA Staff

Walmart Labs is on the hunt for some tech talent.

The discount giant’s technology division wants to hire 150 technology workers at its Sunnyvale and San Bruno, California locations, according to The Mercury News.

According to the report, Walmart wants to onboard software engineers, back-end technologies experts, data scientists, product managers, mobile developers, systems engineers, artificial intelligence experts, cloud engineers and data science experts.

The hiring spree coincides with Walmart’s efforts to deliver new digital solutions to its customers, and to meld advanced technologies with its existing brick-and-mortar operations, such as stores, warehouses and distribution centers, the report said.

To read more, click here.

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Study: Consumers are still not ‘all in’ on online grocery shopping

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

While more consumers are buying their groceries online, they aren’t ready to give up their store visits just yet.

About 10% of consumers across the United States are now regularly buying groceries online, however the adoption of online grocery shopping is moving at a slower pace than other consumer categories, according to new data from The NDP Group.

According to findings, the benefits of online grocery shopping, like not needing to leave home, price comparisons, speed, and not waiting in lines, are enough for a growing number of consumers to be enticed. Yet, these factors are not encouraging them to do all of their grocery shopping online.

Nearly all online grocery shoppers (99%) still shop in brick and mortar grocery stores — and the reasons for their visits vary. Consumer preferences when shopping for foods and beverages, and logistical challenges are the primary reasons why consumers haven’t gone all in on online grocery shopping. Wanting to pick out their own fresh items was the top barrier to their shopping online for groceries, followed by not wanting to pay a delivery fee.

Many consumers (46%) who are lapsed online grocery shoppers or have never shopped online said walking through a store reminds them of what else they need. While one of the key benefits of online shopping is speed, 46% of consumers who aren’t online grocery shopping enthusiasts feel it’s still faster to go to the store.

Groceries may in fact follow the same path as other categories, like electronics, where consumers still want to see the item up close and personal. Like electronics, often the answer is in an omnichannel approach, which many of the major grocers are now offering, according to NPD.

“With major brick-and-mortar grocery stores announcing click-and-collect and various speedy delivery options, the line between physical and online is blurring and, as a result, consumers are getting the best of both worlds,” said Darren Seifer, NPD food and beverage industry analyst. “There is also a place for pure-play e-commerce grocers, but it looks like, as of now, consumers want a seamless experience between brick-and-mortar and e-commerce.”

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