TECHNOLOGY

Amazon’s Prime Day will be…

BY CSA Staff

A technology glitch may have leaked the date of Amazon’s fourth annual Prime Day.

The shopping extravaganza reserved for Prime members is reportedly scheduled to start around midday on July 16, and continue through the following day, according to TechRadar.

A Prime Day 2018 banner was published on the Amazon U.K. website, presumably in error, and discovered by TechRadar on Thursday morning, according to the report.

This year’s event will be 36 hours long. Not only will it eclipse last year’s 30-hour event, it will also be the company’s longest Prime Day event to date, TechRadar revealed.

To read more, click here.

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Study: All retailers can profit from Amazon’s Prime Day

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Prime Day is poised to become one of the top e-commerce shopping days of the year — and not just for Amazon.

Prime Day 2017 proved that the amount of retailers that are leveraging the shopping holiday to capture their own market share is on the rise. The number of unique retailers that issued deals on digital coupon site RetailMeNot.com increased 340%, from 27 retailers in 2016 to 119 retailers in 2017, according to data from RetailMeNot.

Last year, Amazon Prime Day was RetailMeNot’s biggest online shopping day of Q3 across a variety of retailers and categories. That was up significantly from its 21st position in Q3 of 2016. Prime Day deals consisted of distinct messaging strategies: coupon codes contained the word “Prime,” and offers used phrases like “Prime Time,” “Black Friday in July” and “Cyber Monday in July.” They were also characterized by short-lived availability, aggressive discounts, sitewide codes and free shipping.

Retailers actively competing on Prime Day last year saw more than a 30% increase in online traffic to their RetailMeNot.com store pages. Those who didn’t participate experienced a 4% decrease in online traffic to their RetailMeNot store pages. While Amazon’s store page received 4% of visits to RetailMeNot.com on Prime Day in 2017, the vast majority (96%) of consumer website demand was driven by retailers other than Amazon.

Many retailers — and customers — also used Prime Day 2017 as an opportunity to spur back-to-school shopping. This year’s shopping holiday is expected to tell a similar story, as 91% of customers who plan to shop that day will make a back-to-school-related purchase. They have also allotted $70 of their Prime Day budgets (an average of $167) toward back-to-school items, the study revealed.

To be sure to grab this wallet share, 60% of companies plan to run promotional offerings that will target shoppers before Prime Day arrives. Further, more than half (54%) will run offers to coincide with Prime Day, and 53% will target shoppers in the following days who may have missed out.

These efforts could push Prime Day 2018 to become one of the top e-commerce shopping days of the year — potentially rivaling Black Friday and Cyber Monday in popularity, according to the study.

“Prime Day is a huge opportunity for all retailers,” said Marissa Tarleton, chief marketing officer of RetailMeNot.

“This relatively new shopping holiday has quickly become the kickoff for the back-to-school shopping season,” she added. “In both sales and opportunity, this day is transformative not just for Amazon but for all retailers savvy enough to capitalize on it. The day is here to stay, and it benefits consumers and retailers alike.”

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Amazon rolls out try-before-you-buy program to all Prime members

BY Deena M. Amato-McCoy

Amazon’s Prime Wardrobe service is now available to all Prime members — and no invitation is necessary.

Amazon’s Prime members across the United States can now participate in its try-before-you-buy Prime Wardrobe program. The service launched as an invitation-only beta test last year. Since then, Prime Wardrobe members have ordered “thousands of styles,” according to blog on Amazon’s website.

Members can choose merchandise across women’s, men’s, kids’, and baby clothing, shoes, and accessories. Levi’s, AG Adriano Goldschmied, Paige, Calvin Klein, Adidas, Puma, Native, as well as Amazon’s private-label merchandise, are among the featured brands.

Shoppers can order (and try on) between three and eight items of clothing, shoes or accessories before they actually have to buy any merchandise — with no upfront charge or added styling fee. Shoppers can keep the items for seven days. They return unwanted pieces and only pay for the items they keep.

Merchandise is shipped in resealable packaging that contains a pre-paid return label. Unwanted items can be returned through UPS. Shipping takes between four and six business days.

The service takes a swing at other personalized online shopping services, including Stitch Fix, Tog + Porter, Trunk Club, even Kidbox, that use in-house stylists to pull together personalized outfits based on consumer preferences.

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